Trending February 2024 # Textsplit, Textbefore And Textafter Functions # Suggested March 2024 # Top 6 Popular

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It’s been a long wait, but we finally have some exciting new Excel text functions that are going to make life so much easier. In this tutorial I’m going to focus on TEXTAFTER, TEXTBEFORE and most exciting, TEXTSPLIT. The first two functions are fairly self-explanatory, and so is TEXTSPLIT to a degree. However, in this tutorial I’m going to show you some cool tricks that aren’t immediately obvious and aren’t covered in Microsoft’s documentation.

Note: At the time of writing these functions are currently only available to Microsoft 365 users on the Insider channel, but hopefully they’ll be generally available to all Microsoft 365 users soon.

UPDATE: since filming this tutorial these functions have had additional arguments added to them as a result of feedback received while in the beta testing phase. The written tutorial below has been updated, but the video is based on the original function syntax. All examples, except example 5 for TEXTSPLIT, still apply with the updated syntax.

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TEXTAFTER Function

The TEXTAFTER function extracts the text from a string that occurs after the specified delimiter.

Syntax: =TEXTAFTER(text, delimiter, [instance_num], [match_mode], [match_end], [if_not_found])

input_text The text you are searching within. Wildcard characters not allowed. Required. delimiter The text that marks the point after which you want to extract. Required. instance_num The nth instance of text_after that you want to extract.  By default, n=1.  A negative number starts searching input_text from the end. Optional. match_mode Determines whether the text search is case-sensitive. The default is case-sensitive. Optional. Enter 0 for case sensitive or 1 for case insensitive. Optional. match_end Treats the end of text as a delimiter. By default, the text is an exact match. Optional. Enter 0 to not match the delimiter against the end of the text, or 1 to match the delimiter against the end of the text. Optional. if_not_found DValue returned if no match is found. By default, #N/A is returned. Optional.

TEXTBEFORE Function

The TEXTBEFORE function extracts the text from a string that occurs before the specified delimiter.

Syntax: =TEXTBEFORE(text, delimiter, [instance_num], [match_mode], [match_end], [if_not_found])

input_text The text you are searching within. Wildcard characters not allowed. Required. delimiter The text that marks the point before which you want to extract. Required. instance_num The nth instance of text_after that you want to extract.  By default, n=1.  A negative number starts searching input_text from the end. Optional. match_mode Determines whether the text search is case-sensitive. The default is case-sensitive. Optional. Enter 0 for case sensitive or 1 for case insensitive. Optional. match_end Treats the end of text as a delimiter. By default, the text is an exact match. Optional. Enter 0 to not match the delimiter against the end of the text, or 1 to match the delimiter against the end of the text. Optional. if_not_found DValue returned if no match is found. By default, #N/A is returned. Optional.

And if you want to extract just the domain name you can wrap TEXTBEFORE in TEXTAFTER:

TEXTSPLIT Function

The TEXTSPLIT function splits text strings using column and, or row delimiters.

Syntax: =TEXTSPLIT(text, col_delimiter, [row_delimiter], [ignore_empty], [match_mode], [pad_with])

input_text The text you want to split. Required. col_delimiter One or more characters that specify where to spill the text across columns. Optional. row_delimiter One or more characters that specify where to spill the text down rows. Optional. ignore_empty Specify TRUE to create an empty cell when two delimiters are consecutive. Defaults to FALSE, which means don’t create an empty cell. Optional. match_mode Searches the text for a delimiter match. By default, a case-sensitive match is done. pad_with Text entered in place of blank results.

We’ll use the text string below in the TEXTSPLIT function examples. You can see it has several delimiters we can use including forward slash, space, comma and parentheses.

Sydney/2000 (11%),Riverina/2678 (42%),Newcastle/2300 (9%),Illawarra/2500 (23%)

Note: The above text string is in cell C14 and will be referenced in the examples below.

Example 1.1 – Split text by comma delimiter across columns:

An easy way to split this string is by comma delimiter and we can write that formula like so:

Notice it spills the results to columns C:F in a dynamic array. We can then reference this array using the array spill operator # as follows: =C18#

Example 1.2 – Split text by comma delimiter down rows:

Notice the two commas after C14 instruct Excel to skip the col_delimiter argument.

Example 2.1 – Split text by comma delimiter and forward slash across columns:

Notice the data after the forward slash is discarded.

Example 2.2 – Split text by comma delimiter and forward slash down rows:

Example 3 – Split text by all delimiters down rows:

In this formula the TEXTSPLIT function does the bulk of the work:

=SUBSTITUTE(

TEXTSPLIT(C14,,{",","/","("}),")

","")

Notice the delimiters have been entered in an array constant with curly braces:

=SUBSTITUTE(TEXTSPLIT(C14,,

{",","/","("}

),")","")

And then the SUBSTITUTE function cleans up the closing parenthesis:

=

SUBSTITUTE

(TEXTSPLIT(C14,,{",","/","("})

,")","")

Example 4 – Split text into rows and columns:

Here I’ve used both the row and column delimiters. This formula also requires TRUE in the ignore_empty argument to ensure the spacing of the results is correct.

Example 5 – Handing errors:

In this example we’re using a slightly different text string shown in cell C61 in the image below. Notice Newcastle is missing data and ‘Byron Bay’ on the end also has no data and none of the delimiters, which results in errors:

The last argument in the TEXTSPLIT function is ‘padding’ and we can use this field to hide or replace errors returned by gaps in the data with something else. In the example below I’ve entered the word ‘padding’ so you can see.

Alternatively, you can enter two double quotes to simply hide the errors:

You're reading Textsplit, Textbefore And Textafter Functions

What Are Parameterized Typescript Functions?

Introduction to TypeScript Functions

Any programming language has its own set of predefined functions. And some functions are going to be defined by us. Functions are the main building blocks of any programming paradigm. If you know JavaScript functions then it is a lot easier to know about typescript functions. Typescript is a superset of JavaScript and for typescript, you need to be familiar with its ES6 syntax.

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How to Define TypeScript Functions?

Syntax:

function add(a,b) { return a*b; }

We will also see the same example for anonymous functions.

Example:

function add(a: number ,b: number): number { return a*b; } How to Call TypeScript Functions?

If you are writing any function, then it has to be called to execute it. Writing function is known as a function definition in programming. We are calling the function with the function name and a pair of parenthesis.

For example, let’s take the above add function. We will call that function as below.

add(5,10); How to Return TypeScript Functions?

In this example you can see there are many situations where we have used return keyword is just to return value from it. We can return any type of value. If you want to return something from a function at that time you must use return statement with the semicolon. We can only return one and only one value from a single function. While returning the value we must check that returning value and type function should be the same so that the caller get the return value.

Example:

function cake():string { return "Welcome to the world of cakes" } function bake() { var bakery = cake(); console.log(bakery); } bake()

Look at the above example carefully, here we have two functions one is bake and the other is cake. We are calling function cake inside the function bake. And function cake returning the string value. In the bake function, we are assigning our functional call to the variable bakery. Then we log that variable to the console. Upon executing this we will get “Welcome to the world of cakes ” as an output. It is easy to understand with little practice.

What is Parameterized TypeScript Functions?

The parameter is the case where a user has to give some value to work on. The parameter has to be considered important if mentioned. We must have to give respective values to each parameter in typescript. In programming, while working with parameterized functions no arguments should be matched with no of arguments.

Example:

function student(fName: string, lName: string) { return fName + " " + lName; } let student1= student ("John", "roy");

We will look at the example. Take the same function student and we will try to make some parameters optional.

Example:

function student(fName: string, lName?: string) { return fName + " " + lName; } let student1= student ("John");

In above example we just gave value for first name parameter. And it will work without the second parameter. Now it will not show any error.

Now, other than this if we wanted to give some default value to the parameter then we can do that.

Example:

function student(fName: string, lName: string = "rey") { return fName + " " + lName; } let student1= student ("John");

Now, the above program will work correctly without any errors. It is fine to give a default value to the parameter.

Examples of TypeScript Functions

Following are the examples as given below:

Example #1

Here in the above example, we used an arrow function. Note that here we are not using the return statement because as per the convention if we have only one statement and i.e return statement then we don’t need to write it explicitly. This is shorthand syntax and is most commonly used in typescript.

Example #2

We can call one function as many times as we want, look at the below example to know more.

function student(fName: string, lName?:string) { return fName + " " + lName; } student ("John"); student ("sam"); student ("ken"); student ("bren");

And simultaneously we made last name parameter optional. So that we don’t need to give the second parameter.

Example #3

Another example we are going to look for rest parameters. Till now we have seen parameters like optional, default and required. But there is one more case to this. What if we don’t know how much parameters the function will exactly take.

We will make use of the ellipsis (…) operator here. Again we will take the above example of a student.

function student(fName: string, …remainigStudents: string [] ) { return fName + " " + remainigStudents.join(" "); } let allStudents = student("john", "sam", "reema", "kerry", "jem");

If you look closely we have given n no of arguments. But in a function definition, we just gave two parameters. But look at that three dots(…0) before the second parameter. It is called ellipsis. Which helps us do so.

Writing functions and work on them needs some debugging skills. For working with functions you need to understand the ES6 features of JavaScript.

Conclusion

Working with functions is the most important thing because by combining these functions we are designing the functionality. Functions in typescript are referred to as ES6 syntax. This is mostly seen with the arrow functions. ES6 is an ECMASript standard for JavaScript. We also have ES7 now and more releases will come in the future with some new features.

Recommended Articles

We hope that this EDUCBA information on “TypeScript Functions” was beneficial to you. You can view EDUCBA’s recommended articles for more information.

Callback Functions For Video Js Player

In this tutorial, we’ll learn about the various event listeners and how to use them with callback functions for a chúng tôi player. chúng tôi is a popular, open-source library used for creating video players in browsers. Using chúng tôi you can tweak every single part of a video player without much problems or hassle. Aside from that, chúng tôi provides a plethora of default events like play, pause, playing, loadedmetadata, timeupdate, canplaythrough, loadeddata etc.

So, for the purpose of this tutorial, we’re going to learn about the callback functions of various event listeners in chúng tôi Callback functions are really crucial as they are triggered when a certain event happens. So, we can perform different actions with the help of various callback functions. Now let’s move to the following section of the article to understand the various events and their callback functions.

Callback Functions for chúng tôi Player

Callback functions are those functions that are passed as an input argument to another function. However, callback functions are extensively used to continue the execution of code after an async operation like events. Event listeners are functions or methods that are invoked when a specific event is triggered. For example, an event can be playing a video or pausing a video, etc. By making use of the event listeners and callback functions we can achieve our desired functionality.

Basically, the event listeners keep waiting continuously for some user interactions to happen like playing a video, pausing a video then executing the corresponding callback function when the event triggers.

If we talk about chúng tôi specifically, you get a plethora of event listeners which can be used to change the state of a video player. For example, play, pause, resume, etc.

For the purpose of this article, we’re going to go through the following events and their callback functions one by one −

LoadedData Event

LoadedMetaData Event

Time Update Event

Ended Event Event

Let’s quickly have a look at each one of these.

LoadedData Event

The callback function of ‘loadeddata’ event is triggered when the current frame of a video is loaded. The current frame is usually the first frame of the video. So, when the current frame is loaded but not the next frame, the callback function of the loadeddata event is triggered.

Prerequisite − Assuming that you know how to create a basic video player using the chúng tôi library, let’s learn how to capture the ‘loadeddata’ event using video.js

You can capture ‘loadeddata’ event by using ‘loadeddata’ as an input on the reference of your chúng tôi player using the player.on() method. It binds the event and the callback function together. It usually accepts two parameters as input, the first one being the event name (loadeddata in our case) and the second parameter is the callback function which will get invoked as soon as the defined event is triggered. So, callback functions passed to ‘loadeddata’ event listener are going to be executed whenever the current frame (first frame) of the video player has been loaded.

You can use the following code to capture the ‘loadeddata’ event and trigger the callback function to alert a text in the browser window −

const player = videojs(‘my-video-player’);

player.on(‘loadeddata’, function () { window.alert(‘Video Player Data Loaded’); });

In the preceding snippet, we used the ‘loadeddata’ event listener on our video player reference using the ‘player.on()’ method to alert ‘Video Player Data Loaded’ whenever the current frame of the video player is loaded.

Example 1

Here we have showed how the complete example for using loadeddata event listener will look like −

<video

preload=”true” controls=”true” fluid=”true” muted=”true” autoplay=”true” poster=”assets/sample.png” data-setup='{}’ <source type=”video/mp4″ const player = videojs(‘my-video-player’);

player.on(‘loadeddata’, function () { window.alert(‘Video Player Data Loaded’); });

We’ve tried to implement the following things in the above code

The execution of the above code is going to create a video player in the browser, which is going to show an alert message on windows when the current frame or the first frame of our video is loaded.

Now that we know how to use the callback function with ‘loadeddata’ event listener, let’s move to the next section of this article to understand the ‘loadedmetadata’ listener.

LoadedMetaData Event

The callback function of the ‘Loadedmetadata’ event listener is invoked when the browser has loaded the metadata i.e duration, dimension, text tracks, etc of a video. This listener can be very beneficial when we are loading the video from a URL or third-party API. In those scenarios, we need to wait for the video to be loaded before we make any changes to the player.

For using this listener, we’ll need to use ‘loadedmetadata” as input to the video player reference using the ‘player.on()’ method.

You can use the following code for showing a message whenever the metadata of our video is loaded using the ‘loadedmetadata’ event with a callback function −

let player = videojs(‘my-video-player’);

player.on(‘loadedmetadata’, function () { window.alert(‘Video Player Meta Data Loaded’); });

In the above snippet, ‘loadedmetadata’ event listener has been used to wait till the metadata of a video is loaded before alerting a text. The callback function of this event is invoked even before the ‘play’ event listener as a video needs to be loaded first before it is played.

Now, let’s move on to learn about the callback function of the next event listener.

Time Update Event

The callback function of ‘Timeupdate’ event listener is one of the most important listeners as it gets triggered every time the video’s current playback time is changed. So, as a video is being played, this event gets triggered every 15 250 ms. This callback function on this event can be used with ‘timeupdate’ as input to the chúng tôi method.

Consider the below snippet for showing a message, when our video has crossed the 15 seconds mark using ‘timeupdate’ event listener with a callback function −

let player = videojs(‘my-video-player’);

let alertShown = false; player.on(‘timeupdate’, function () { window.alert(‘Video has Played for 15 seconds!’); alertShown = true; } });

In the above snippet, we’ve used the ‘timeupdate’ event to alert a text when the video has played for 15 seconds with the help of a callback function. Notice how the currentTime() method is used to get the current time of a video player.

Now, let’s move on to the callback function of the ended event listener.

Ended Listener

Callback function of ‘Ended’ event listener is invoked when our video has ended. It can be used for showing a replay button or playing the next video when the current one has ended. For using this listener, we’ll need to use ‘ended’ as input to the video player reference using the ‘player.on()’ method.

Let’s alert a message when a video ends, using the ‘ended’ listener with a callback function −

let player = videojs(‘my-video-player’);

player.on(‘ended’, function () { window.alert(‘Video Player Ended!’); });

In the above snippet, we’ve used the ‘ended’ listener to display a text on the window when our current video has finished playing.

Example 2

Adding all the above event listeners to the complete example will look something like this −

<video

preload=”true” controls=”true” muted=”true” autoplay=”true” fluid=”true” poster=”assets/sample.png” data-setup='{ }’ <source type=”video/mp4″ let player = videojs(‘my-video-player’);

player.on(‘loadeddata’, function () { window.alert(‘Video Player Data Loaded’); });

let alertShown = false; player.on(‘timeupdate’, function () { window.alert(‘Video has Played for 15 seconds!’); alertShown = true; } });

player.on(‘loadedmetadata’, function () { window.alert(‘Video Player MetaData Loaded’); });

player.on(‘ended’, function () { window.alert(‘Video Player Ended!’); });

On execution of the above code, a video player will be created which will display text messages, when the video metadata is loaded, then when the video data is loaded and when the video has ended.

Conclusion

In this tutorial, we understood the callback functions of various event listeners that can be used in a chúng tôi player like loadeddata, laodedmetadata, timeupdate, and ended. We also saw how can we use these listeners with callback functions with the help of fully working examples.

Azure Functions Runtime Is Unreachable Error: Fix

Azure Functions Runtime Is Unreachable Error: Fix Firewall prevents the Azure Function host from working correctly

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You can get this error if your firewall settings are incorrect, the storage account is deleted, or you have reached the daily execution quota. 

This guide will discuss the causes of the issue and the steps you need to take to resolve the error.

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Download Fortect and install it on your PC.

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Azure Functions Runtime is unreachable error occurs when the Functions runtime can’t start. Usually, this happens if you have exceeded the daily execution quota or deleted the storage account.

In this guide, we will help you troubleshoot the causes of the error and resolve the issue. Let’s start!

What causes the Azure functions runtime is unreachable error?

There could be various reasons why functions app runtime error occurs; some of the popular ones are: 

Lost access to storage account – If the function app has lost access to the storage account, you might get this error. 

Storage account deleted– If you have mistakenly deleted the storage account, then you can encounter this error. You need to create a new storage account.

Storage account settings – If you have input the wrong credentials or deleted some of the settings, then you might get this error message. Check the storage account credentials and application settings to know the issue.

Daily execution quota – If you have exhausted the daily execution quota assigned, then the function app will be disabled temporarily. Increase the quota to fix the issue.

Network connectivity issues– If the function app has IP restrictions blocking internet access or inbound traffic, you might get this error.

How can I fix the Azure functions runtime is unreachable error? 1. Check if the storage account has been deleted 

All function apps need a storage account to work, and if the account is deleted, functions won’t operate. To fix this, check these elements: 

First, look for your storage account in the application settings. 

Now check whether WEBSITE_CONTENTAZUREFILECONNECTIONSTRING or AzureWebJobsStorage contains a storage account’s name as part of a connection string.

You can also search for it in the Azure portal to confirm the storage account exists.

If you can’t find the account, you need to recreate the storage account.

Then, replace the storage connection strings. 

Also, check for the function code; if not available, you need to deploy it again.

2. Check if storage account application settings are deleted

If the connection string was overwritten or deleted, you might not find it. This could have happened because you use Azure Resource Manager scripts or deployment slots to set application settings.

Expert tip:

To avoid this error, it is recommended that you use the AzureWebJobsStorage element.

Do not activate the slot setting options for any of the settings.

These settings must be provided and valid at the time of the creation.

3. Check if the storage account is accessible 

The Azure function application must have access to the storage account to operate. Here are some things you need to do to resolve the issue: 

Verify that the firewall for your storage account is disabled and allows incoming and outgoing traffic to the functions.

Set the allowSharedKeyAccess to True as the default value.

Check if the Azure function app is installed in ASE (App Service Environment) with the proper network rules, allowing incoming and outgoing traffic to the storage account. 

4. Daily execution quota exhausted 5. Check the firewall settings for the function app

A firewall could restrict the function app; check these areas to be certain: 

Your function app is hosted within an App Service Environment that uses internal load balancing and is set to prevent incoming internet traffic.

The function app has IP restrictions to prevent access to the internet.

Once you know there are restrictions, go to the subnet’s NSG (Network Security Group), which contains the App Service Environment.

Ensure that the inbound rules are set to permit traffic originating from the computer’s public IP address you are using to access the application.

6. Container errors on Linux

If there is a problem with the container, then the function apps running on Linux in a container can show the error. To fix this, follow these steps: 

Still experiencing issues?

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Vlookup In Power Query Using List Functions

If you’ve done lookups in Power Query to pull values from one table into another, you may have used a query merge to do this.

Mynda has written previously on how to do an Exact Match in Power Query and an Approximate Match in Power Query

Here I’ll be showing you how to use List Functions in Power Query to do both Exact and Approximate matches.

This approach requires a little more M coding but requires less steps and is my preferred method for doing lookups. But hey, I would think that, I’m a coder 🙂

Using List Functions

The key to doing this is remembering that table columns are lists, and as such you can use List Functions to manipulate the data in them.

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Exact Match

My sample data is a table of sales on different dates for different types of food and drink. This table is named data.

What I want to do is add a column showing the category for each item. These categories are stored in a separate lookup table named categories.

I’ve loaded both tables into PQ and set categories to load as connection only because I don’t need to create a new table from it.

So with both tables loaded into PQ, let’s look at what we need to do.

The Food & Drink query needs to get the Category from the Categories table. By looking up the value in the Food & Drink[Product] column in the Categories[Product] column we can get the row number in Categories[Product] that matches.

Using that row number as an index on the Categories[Category] column will return the Category.

Let’s do this step by step. Start by adding a Custom Column and calling it Category Index.

Using the List.PositionOf function, I want to look up in the Categories[Product] column, the value in this [Product] column.

The new column shows the position of each Product in the Categories table.

Remember that Lists are indexed from 0, so Apple Juice is in Position 0 of the [Product] column in the Categories table.

Atlantic Salmon is position 65 etc.

Now that I have this index number I can use it to lookup the category. Create another Custom Column and call it Category.

What I need to do here is enter a reference to the value in the Categories[Category] column. This is done by specifying the Category Index value inside curly braces after the Table[Column] reference.

Let’s do a litle tidying up, We don’t need the category Index column now so delete it, and reorder the columns.

Before I finish though, I can make things a little neater. I like reducing my steps and code where possible.

You can see in the Added Custom step that the code creates the Category Index column

And the subsequent Added Custom1 step it uses the values from that Category Index column.

You can take the code List.PositionOf( Categories[Product] , [Product] ) from the Added Custom step, and replace [Category Index] in the Added Custom1 step with it.

This condenses the code from two steps into one and you end up with the same result.

As the Added Custom step is no longer needed, delete it. Also delete the Removed Columns step as all that is doing is deleting the Category Index column. But as the query is no longer creating that column, this step is not needed either. I don’t actually need to create the Category Index column at all.

OK so the query is done, load to the sheet and that’s our finished table.

Approximate Match

To do an approximate match I’m going to use this table of sales figures for various sales people and add a new column showing the bonus rate they’ll get for those sales.

The idea being that you multiply the sales amount by the bonus rate to work out the bonus the sales person gets paid.

The bonus rates are stored in a separate table called excitingly, BonusRates.

Make sure the table is sorted in ascending order on the Threshold value. It’s important to note that the first row has $0 threshold and a rate of 0.

The reason for this will become clear as I explain how the lookup query works

The bonus rate is determined by the sales amount. If you sell $10,000 or more, but less than $20,000 then the rate is 0.1

If you sell $20,000 or more but less than $30,000 then the rate is 0.15, etc

Load both tables in Power Query and set the Bonus Rates lookup table to connection only.

What I need to do here is of course look up the sales amounts in the BonusRates table. But this time I’ll use List.Select to create a list of all values in the BonusRates[Threshold] column less than or equal to the Sales Amount

The number of elements in this list will be used as the index to lookup up the bonus rate.

I’ll use the first sales value of $17,606 as an example. There are 2 values in the Threshold column less than or equal to $17,606.

The List.Select function creates a list containing 0 and 10000. Then by counting the items in this list, I can use that number to return the 2nd item in the Rate column which is 0.1, or 10%

Let’s look at the code. Open the Power Query editor and add a Custom Column called BonusRates and add this code

I’ll explain what’s going on here

The variable val contains the Sales value in the current row of this table. Remember that the code written here is run for every row in the Sales column.

List.Select creates a list containing all values in the BonusRates[Threshold] column, that are greater than or equal to the value in val.

The each _ is shorthand for the current item in the BonusRates[Threshold] column. It’s saying compare val with each item in the BonusRates[Threshold] column

The result of this code is a column of lists.

For the Sales value 9238 the BonusRates list contains just a 0, because the minimum sale amount to get a bonus is $10,000.

If there wasn’t a row in the lookup table with 0 threshold then the list for any sales value less than 10000 would be empty. When the query tried to lookup an index using an empty list it would generate an error. Having the 0 Threshold row means that the code will always create a non-empty list and avoid such errors.

Checking the list in row 4 for the Sales value 32455 shows that the list contains 4 items, because this sale amount crosses the $30,000 threshold.

With this new column of lists I can now count the items in each list and lookup the bonus rate for the Sales amounts.

Add another custom column, call it Bonus Rate, with this code

What we need to do is lookup the value from the Rate column in the BonusRates table, and the number of items in the list created in the previous step is the index to that value.

Remember that lists are indexed from 0 so if list has 2 items then the 2nd item is at position 1. Therefore we have to subtract 1 from the count of items in the list

I can now calculate the bonus amount in Power Query, or load this table to Excel and do it there.

How To Use The Count Functions In Microsoft Excel

How to Use the COUNT Function

The COUNT function in Excel is one of the most basic of the five functions. Use it to count the number of cells containing values, which is handy for seeing the number of sales, reviews, or numeric grades in your sheet. Note that text is not counted as a value.

The syntax for the formula is COUNT(value1, value2,…), where only the first argument is required. You can enter the range of cells and add up to 255 additional items or cell ranges using the remaining arguments.

For this first example, we’re using the COUNT function via the following formula to total the number of cells containing values in our range B2 through B11:

=

COUNT

(

B2

:

B11

)

To show the difference if you have text in a cell rather than a number, you can see our next result is 9 instead of 10, as cell B8 contains the word “six.”

If you want to count the total numbers in a cell range, but not place the formula in your sheet, use the Status Bar at the bottom of the Excel window.

How to Use the COUNTA Function

The syntax is similar to the COUNT function, COUNTA(value1, value2,…), where only the first argument is required, and you can include up to 255 additional arguments. Keep in mind that the function counts cells that contain errors, formulas, and formula results, as these cells are not blank.

In this example, we’re using the following formula to count the number of cells containing values in our range B2 through C11:

=

COUNTA

(

B2

:

C11

)

Our result is 16, as that’s the number of cells in our range that contain values.

Note: if you need to remove empty cells or want to surface data that meets specific criteria, try using filters in Excel.

How to Use the COUNTBLANK Function

The syntax is COUNTBLANK(range), where you have just one argument for the cell range.

Using the following formula, we’re counting the number of blank cells in the range B2 through C11:

=

COUNTBLANK

(

B2

:

C11

)

Our result is 4 empty cells.

Tip: want to reorganize your data so that columns become rows and vice versa? Transpose your data in Excel to make that happen.

How to Use the COUNTIF Function

The syntax is COUNTIF(value, criteria), where both arguments are required. Use the “value” argument for the cell range and the “criteria” argument for the data you want to locate. You’ll need to place the condition you use for the second argument within quotation marks if it’s text or a comparison operator.

In this first example, we’re counting the number of cells in the range B2 through B11 that contain the number 10 with this formula:

=

COUNTIF

(

B2

:

B11,

10

)

The result is 3 cells that contain the value of 10.

For an example using text, we’re counting the number of cells in the range A2 through A11 that start with “San.” Use the formula:

=

COUNTIF

(

A2

:

A11,

"San*"

)

“San*” was added in quotation marks using an asterisk (*) as a wildcard so that any letters after “San” are counted. We received a result of 2.

For an example that uses a comparison operator, we’re counting the number of cells in the range C2 through C11 that are less than or equal to 5,000 with this formula:

=

COUNTIF

(

C2

:

C11,

"<=5000"

)

We placed our comparison operator “<=5000” within quotes and received a count of 7.

How to Use the COUNTIFS Function

If you like the idea of entering criteria for the cells you want to count but would like to narrow it down even further or total values in more cells, use the COUNTIFS function. You can count cells that contain multiple conditions instead of just one when using the COUNTIF function.

The syntax is COUNTIFS(range1, criteria1, range2, criteria2,…), where the first two arguments are required for the cell range and condition. Use the additional arguments for the second set of cells and/or conditions.

For this example, we’re counting the number of records containing a 10 in the range B2 through B11 and a value of 1,000 in the range C2 though C11 using this formula:

=

COUNTIFS

(

B2

:

B11,

10

,C2

:

C11,

1000

)

Our result is 2 records that have both 10 and 1,000 in those cell ranges.

Using a text example, we’re counting the number of records that start with the letter “S” in the range A2 through A11 and have a value greater than 9 in the range B2 through B11 with this formula:

In another example, we’re using the same cell range for multiple criteria. We’re counting the number of records that have a value less than 10,000 and greater than 2,000 in the range C2 through C11 with this formula:

Tip: if you also use Google’s apps, check out several helpful functions for Google Sheets, too.

Frequently Asked Questions How do I auto count cells in Excel?

If you need to add numbers to cells in a column or row, use Excel’s auto-fill feature. To start counting at one, enter 1 in the first cell and 2 in the second cell. Then, select both cells and drag the fill handle (square in the bottom-right corner) down a column or across a row to fill the remaining cells.

To use a different numbering scheme, for example, 10, 20, 30, and so on, enter the first two numbers you want to use in the first two cells, then use the fill handle. Excel should recognize your numbering pattern and comply.

How do I sum values in Excel?

You can use the SUM function to add values in cells together. This is handy for totaling your monthly bills, sales, or inventory.

The Status Bar in Excel shows information about your sheet, errors you may encounter, and quick calculations, like those mentioned above. This displays at the bottom of the window in Excel, as well as other Microsoft applications, like Word and PowerPoint.

Image credit: Pixabay. All screenshots by Sandy Writtenhouse.

Sandy Writtenhouse

With her BS in Information Technology, Sandy worked for many years in the IT industry as a Project Manager, Department Manager, and PMO Lead. She wanted to help others learn how technology can enrich business and personal lives and has shared her suggestions and how-tos across thousands of articles.

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Update the detailed information about Textsplit, Textbefore And Textafter Functions on the Achiashop.com website. We hope the article's content will meet your needs, and we will regularly update the information to provide you with the fastest and most accurate information. Have a great day!