Trending February 2024 # Tesla Semi Looks Like A Bullet But Experts Doubt It Will Act Like One # Suggested March 2024 # Top 3 Popular

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The Tesla Semi looks like a bullet more than a barn wall and is the next big thing to hit the road

Forget the Cybertruck and the Shell Starship 2.0; the Tesla Semi is a much more significant truck. Here’s what it’s all about and why it’s important as it makes its official debut on the road. According to the firm, the Tesla Semi looks like a bullet than a barn wall.

Aerodynamic style is nothing new in the large rig industry, but the Tesla Semi resembles the Shell Starship of the future more than anything already on the road. However, the wheels are extremely commonplace. There could be a rule in effect there. The driver has equally superb visibility on all sides and a perspective ahead that nearly makes it appear as though they are standing on the Tesla’s autonomous electric truck sloping bonnet, rather than behind it, thanks to the driver’s seat being centered rather than offset as in normal automobiles and electric truck.

Except for a few federally required safety buttons, the typical jungle of gauges and controls is replaced by dual 15-inch displays on either side of the wheel. It is possible to stand up in the cab. No mention of a CB radio with a software definition.

On a single charge of its 900-kWh battery, Tesla’s Semi has traveled 500 miles, making it the most expensive model of the truck, which is anticipated to retail for between $180,000 and $200,000. The weight of the Tesla Semi itself, which must be reduced from the maximum gross weight of the truck and trailer of 82,000 pounds to determine the total payload the Semi can pull, is a critical unknown. Each additional pound the Semi weighs over a standard diesel rig reduces the amount of cargo an operator can move while fully loaded. Maximum range is considered differently by the trucking business than by the typical EV driver; a projected $150,000 vehicle with a smaller battery would only offer 300 miles but carry greater cargo.

In contrast, Freightliner’s eCascadia has a range of 230 miles, the Nikola TRE has a range of 330 miles, and Volvo’s electric VNR offers 275 miles. A logical time to charge would be after 500 miles, which conveniently coincides with the point at which drivers are required to take a 30-minute break after 8 hours of driving. Though not far behind today’s top vehicles, a 70% charge is reportedly completed in 30 minutes, this won’t happen at your neighborhood Supercharger.

Tesla Megachargers is a new type of charging station with the additional area, voltage, and battery storage to charge large truck batteries indefinitely while reducing the burden on the local power system. Prototype Semis have been spotted charging at Superchargers by attaching multiple charge cables to the truck at the same time, although this appears to be a development workaround rather than a market recommendation. When Elon Musk said Megachargers would be able to deliver a megawatt of power, four times the power delivery of the most powerful Superchargers installed today, I thought I heard wrong, but it makes sense given the truck’s presumed battery capacity.

That juice powers three motors, one of which is utilized for cruising and the other two, which are ganged on one of the axles, only when acceleration is required. Each motor is of the same patented design as those used in Tesla Plaid models. You might chuckle at the 0-to-60 speed of 20 seconds, but it’s astonishing for a truck that weighs 17 times as much as a Model S Plaid and is designed for efficiency more than performance.

A Tesla video of its truck speeding by a standard rig on an upward incline like it’s tethered to a post is a far cry from the typical truck slogging up a slow lane grade. And Tesla claims that the Semi’s motors produce so much regen that the truck can reach the bottom of a lengthy hill while still having cool brakes.

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Crysis 3 Will Have Skyrim Like Depth But Without The Scale

Video game developer Crytek plans to create a game for its upcoming first-person shooter Crysis 3 that is similar to that of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim in depth but without resorting to the scale that the Bethesda team used. Crytek is interested in offering attention to detail, allowing players to take an in-depth look at the world and the various details the team has created. Rasmus Højengaard, who is the senior creative director working at Crytek, has told chúng tôi that, “In Crysis 3, we want scale, but we don’t want the immense scale that Skyrim has. What we then add is detail within that scale that we decide, so that we get this richness in the environment that we want.” He added, “Skyrim, they’re going for epic, epic scale, which means that their micro-detail is prioritised less. Their micro-detail exists in their grandeur rather than in their let’s-take-a-look-at-this-little-thing-here.” In the first Crysis video game, the development team was able to include a lot of ambient detail that was then dropped for the sequel, because of the urban battleground that was featured. For the third game in the series Crytek will reshape New York, creating an urban area that is ruined and overrun by vegetation, which will once again give it the space it needs to offer detail. Rasmus Højengaard says that players will be able to see the movement of light sources, the sway of the various plants and the movement of animals, all distracting him from his primary goal of progressing through the game. Crysis 3 will also give players more options to interact with the richer environment, including a bow that can be used to take out animals as well as enemies. Crysis 3 was officially revealed after a leak offered information on the game and is being prepared for launch in early 2013 on the PC, the PlayStation 3 from Sony and the Xbox 360 from Microsoft.

Video game developer Crytek plans to create a game for its upcoming first-person shooter Crysis 3 that is similar to that of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim in depth but without resorting to the scale that the Bethesda team used. Crytek is interested in offering attention to detail, allowing players to take an in-depth look at the world and the various details the team has created. Rasmus Højengaard, who is the senior creative director working at Crytek, has told chúng tôi that, “In Crysis 3, we want scale, but we don’t want the immense scale that Skyrim has. What we then add is detail within that scale that we decide, so that we get this richness in the environment that we want.” He added, “Skyrim, they’re going for epic, epic scale, which means that their micro-detail is prioritised less. Their micro-detail exists in their grandeur rather than in their let’s-take-a-look-at-this-little-thing-here.” In the first Crysis video game, the development team was able to include a lot of ambient detail that was then dropped for the sequel, because of the urban battleground that was featured. For the third game in the series Crytek will reshape New York, creating an urban area that is ruined and overrun by vegetation, which will once again give it the space it needs to offer detail. Rasmus Højengaard says that players will be able to see the movement of light sources, the sway of the various plants and the movement of animals, all distracting him from his primary goal of progressing through the game. Crysis 3 will also give players more options to interact with the richer environment, including a bow that can be used to take out animals as well as enemies. Crysis 3 was officially revealed after a leak offered information on the game and is being prepared for launch in early 2013 on the PC, the PlayStation 3 from Sony and the Xbox 360 from Microsoft.

Will A Chicken That’s Fed Lemons Taste Like Lemons?

A recent New York Times story looked into the high-end chicken market. These are chickens in stark contrast to factory chickens, fed with produce that’s out of the price range of most humans. David Burke, one of New York City’s most prominent chefs (he runs Fishtail, David Burke Townhouse, David Burke Kitchen, and several others, was a contestant on Top Chef Masters, and, um, has a line of flavor sprays), chimed in with this head-scratcher:

“Listen, if the chickens ate ginger and lemon, you would have a gingery, lemony chicken, I think.”

A ginger-lemon chicken sounds fantastic! But, um, wait a second. Is that scientifically possible?

***

Basic question first: does what you eat affect your flavor? (Using “you” here is kind of odd, assuming that you don’t intend to be eaten later. Anyway!) The answer is, certainly, in a general way. What an animal eats has an effect on its fat: how much of it there is, what texture it is, where it is, and, yes, what it tastes like. “Some compounds do end up in the fat,” says Dr. Annie King, of the University of California at Davis’s Department of Animal Science. “That’s where you’re getting a lot of flavor from.” But not all flavors eaten by the animal will be carried over into the flavor of the meat. Some compounds, like salts, are water-soluble, and others will be metabolized by the animal’s organs before they ever make it to the tissue or fat. But some fat-soluble volatile flavor compounds will survive mostly unscathed through the digestion process and make their way to fat cells in the animal’s body.

So can you impart specific flavors by feeding an animal specific things?

Delicious Jamon Iberico

The challenge with flavoring meat by altering the feed is that many of the strongest flavors–lemon flavor, say–are micronutrients that can’t make up the majority of an animal’s diet. If some component of feed, like corn, makes up the majority of an animal’s diet throughout its life, that will definitely flavor the meat. But lemons are never going to make up a great portion of an animal’s diet. In large quantities, these flavorful micronutrients might actually be harmful.

Let’s look at some examples.

The famous black Iberian pig, raised for the world-famous jamon iberico, a cured ham, is allowed to roam freely through the forests of Spain, gorging on acorns. This pig is noted for its spectacularly marbled flesh, meaning it has an extremely high fat content which is interlaced throughout the muscle tissue–it’s called intramuscular fat–rather than in clumps. The acorn-heavy diet, coupled with the fact that the pigs are highly active in their search for acorns, has some interesting effects on their fat. The pig has very soft fat, low in tough collagen, making it perfect for unheated preparations like ham. And the fat, especially after the curing and drying process, has very high levels of omega 3 fatty acids and oleic acid.

Acorns are high in fat, like most nuts, but the specifics of how they’re metabolized are not well understood. When the pig eats the acorns, its small intestine breaks down the fat in the acorns by using pancreatic lipase, an enzyme secreted from the pancreas. That fat is broken down into a few parts–ethanol, free fatty acids (meaning a fatty acid not attached to another molecule), glycerol–in order for these components to pass through the wall of the intestine. Once they’re past that wall, they reform back into a version of their old form, called a natural triglyceride. Those triglycerides are shuttled throughout the body via the bloodstream, where they can be used for a bunch of different tasks–some will be used as energy, some will contribute cholesterol, and some will simply remain as fats and plop themselves into fatty tissue. Acorn fat, we think, performs much more of that latter task than most other pig feed. This study shows that the intestinal workings of Iberian pigs are not very different from any other breed–the only major difference between the breeds, then, is what they eat.

Oleic acid, as its name suggests, is usually associated with olive oil–it’s an omega-9 fatty acid. (The “omega” number merely refers to a bond in the fatty acid’s chemical formula, not any sort of ranking.) “If [meat] is higher in oleic acid, people tend to prefer the flavor,” says Stephen Smith of Texas A&M’s Department of Animal Science. Research indicates that rats tend to prefer foods high in oleic acid. Pigs fed with other diets, like corn and soybeans, have lower levels of oleic acid, and lower levels of fat, period, than acorn-eating pigs. Your typical factory-farm-raised pig won’t have the rich fatty marbling of an Iberian pig.

The Iberian pigs don’t taste like acorns, though; the high tannin levels in acorns are said to lend the pig a certain flavor, but so far no blind studies have been able to prove a tannic flavor to the pig. The process of metabolizing these foods is highly complex; flavor compounds are much more delicate than the fatty acids inside the acorns, and are likely to be broken down or altered on their trip through the pig’s digestive system. The fatty acids, though, make their way unscathed to be stored in fatty tissue. Plus, the tannic flavor comes from a specific compound–and the pig isn’t getting enough of that compound in its diet for the pork to taste bitter. So clearly this isn’t a simply “you are what you eat,” or, um, “you taste like what you eat” situation. At least, not all the time.

Cows, like the Iberian pigs, mostly eat one kind of feed. Meat cows in this country are often described as either corn-fed or grass-fed (though some are grass-fed and finished on corn).

This 1990 study in the Journal of Animal Science performed lots of surveys to find out if people could tell a flavor difference between corn-fed and grass-fed beef. The study made sure the fat content and texture of the two samples were similar, and then fed them to testers. The result? The grass-fed beef was found to have a “grassy” or “milky-oily” flavor, which the testers, accustomed (as most Americans are) to corn-fed beef, found less desirable than the “beefy” flavor of corn-fed meat. Diving deeper into the various studies, it seems that there are an array of flavor volatiles in the grass-fed meat that aren’t present in the corn-fed; a chemical called phyt-2 ene, for example, was correlated with a grassy flavor. Other compounds, including diacetyl, 2- and 3-pentandione, octane, hexanal, 1-hexanol, and octanal were found to be associated with the “beefy” flavor in corn-fed beef. When the researchers injected the grass-fed beef with some of those “beefy” compounds, they found that the testers could no longer distinguish the difference between the grass-fed and corn-fed beef.

Delicious Grass-Fed Cow

Meat animals are sometimes fed fish oil as a dietary supplement, which has been found to increase joint and organ health. Farms, both factory and not, have a vested interest in keeping their animals at least at a certain level of health; an animal that dies of natural causes is of no use to anyone, and fish oil is a cheap way to improve the health of an animal. But fish oil is extremely pungent, and animals fed fish oil tend to taste…fishy. We already have a chicken of the sea; no need to create a chicken that tastes like it’s from the sea. Fish oil is a micronutrient, but a spectacularly powerful one; it’s easily fat soluble and its flavor compounds appear to be strong enough to survive the metabolyzing process, so the animal doesn’t need to have all that much of it for the flavor compounds to change the test of its flesh.

Fish oil isn’t the only flavorful oil; many kinds of nut oils (walnut, peanut) are also strong in flavor. But it does not appear that anyone has ever attempted to feed a chicken peanut oil to see if it tastes like peanuts. There isn’t really any reason to; unlike fish oil, peanut oil doesn’t have any particularly farm-friendly benefits, and at least one study actually indicated that peanut oil clogs the arteries of some animals (this study was conducted with rabbits).

So, sometimes feed has an obvious effect on flavor, and sometimes it doesn’t. Sometimes it has an unpredictable effect! Say you feed chickens a ton of garlic. You’d expect the chickens to taste like garlic, right? Well, no. Turns out, thanks to this study, that the chemicals in garlic reduce the sulfur content of chicken eggs. So not only did the chickens not taste like garlic–they actually tasted milder than chickens that weren’t fed garlic.

What If The Chicken Tasted Like Lemon Already

What about that lemon chicken? Well, lemon’s flavor is largely in its peel. The chemical compounds that give lemons their flavor are called limonoids, and they are toxic in high doses. This study found that high doses of d-limonene, a type of limonoid, the main flavor compound that tastes “lemony” or “citrusy” to us, causes cancer in rats. Chicken owners don’t recommend you feed your chicken citrus–most don’t like it, and it’s suspected that it negatively affects egg-laying–but more to the point, to significantly increase the concentration of delicious limonoids in the chicken’s flesh, you would almost certainly have to feed them a fatal dose. Grass-fed beef tastes grassy, sure, but that’s all the cow eats. For a supplement to have that same effect, you’d have to feed the animal an awful lot of it–and you generally don’t want to feed an animal an awful lot of a semi-toxic substance.

This isn’t something that’s been studied in too much depth; we’re making some educated guesses here. I spoke to a few meat science and animal science experts, and they were all sort of puzzled by the question. “I don’t think that study has ever been done, in a scientifically controlled experiment,” Dr. King told me. To really figure this one out, you’d need a pretty elaborate experiment, feeding animals different amounts of volatile flavor compounds. You’d need a team of trained testers to eat all these chickens and tell you which, if any, of the chickens actually has a lemony flavor. Nobody’s done that yet (though I’d like to volunteer as a tester, if anyone’s thinking about trying it seriously).

But our sense, having learned about how flavors are metabolized, is that you can’t safely feed a chicken enough lemons to make it taste like lemons. Just adding a few lemons to a chicken’s feed won’t have any effect on its flavor.

Lg G6 Review: It Flies… Like A G6!

LG G6 pricing and availability: what we know so far

LG G6 officially announced: everything you need to know

Is a unique display and solid –  if muted – package enough to make the LG G6 a must-buy? With a package that’s mostly identical to the LG V20, should you buy a G-series or a V-series? Does LG’s decision to ditch the gimmicks and focus on a solid experience pay off? Find out, in our full LG G6 review.

In an effort to bring our readers, and viewers, the most comprehensive review experience possible, the LG G6 was reviewed by two different members of Android Authority. While Lanh Nguyen put together the video linked above, I put together the in-depth written review encompassing both of our opinions to provide the definitive Android Authority view on LG’s latest flagship.

We have both been using a US version of the LG G6 (with wireless charging built in) running the latest pre-final software with OS version 7.0, build number ending D90U and software version ending 709I. Traditionally, we don’t review non-final software but LG has confirmed to us that it is about 95% complete and is ready for review. We’ll be updating this written review with any changes once we get the final retail software update closer to launch.

Design

LG G6 is different from previous LG flagships, and that’s a good thing.

Overall, the LG G6 is different from previous LG flagships, and that’s a good thing. Rather than attempting to reinvent the wheel, LG has gone back to basics. Opting for a metal/glass construction is a safe choice that’s proven to work, and that’s why LG went with it. After last year, LG needed safe to appeal to the masses, and the G6 does just this.

Display

The LG G6 offers a one-handed experience that’s arguably the best of any 5.7-inch phone

LG has made conscious design choices to enhance the one-handed use of the phone, specifically opting for very narrow bezels on the sides, top and bottom. You’ll also find rounded corners for both the display and the outer frame and the result is a one-handed experience that’s arguably the best of any 5.7-inch phone. LG says the decision to make the display and the frame rounded makes the screen more durable against corner impacts versus a traditional screen with regular corners. The rounded corners do provide a nice aesthetic touch, but as Lanh pointed out, they’re not perfectly rounded and you can still see a little sharpness on the corners. It doesn’t take away from the overall experience, but it’s hard to unsee after you notice it for the first time (sorry if we are the bearer of bad news).

LG has built in an app scaling feature that lets you force apps to rescale to 18:9, but you won’t use it as much as you might think as it can cause the content to be cut off, which LG does warn you about. Luckily, Netflix’s original series – such as House of Cards – have been shot in 2:1 natively. Plus, as more devices adopt the new standard, it’s likely other producers will follow suit.

Putting it through our testing, we found the display to have a max manual brightness of 556 nits, which is boosted to a very respectable 663 nits when auto brightness is engaged under direct light. In sunlight, this is likely to be even higher and we’ve had no issues with legibility in all conditions. Its color temperature of 8281 Kelvin is rather on the cool side resulting in a blue-ish tinge to the whites – which is common to all LCD panels – but this isn’t immediately noticeable and the display certainly looks fantastic.

Without doubt, the LG G6’s display is fantastic and hopefully a sign of things to come for future smartphone displays. For years, manufacturers have been trying to make screens larger, but this results in larger phones. With the G6’s rounded corners, slim bezels and 18:9 aspect ratio, we finally have a handset that has a large screen without the big footprint we’ve been accustomed to.

Like most flagships, there’s also an always-on display which does the job and shows you notifications without first making you turn the screen on. The company has also included a new brighter screen option for the always-on display, but Lanh and I both agree – we’re not entirely sure what this feature accomplishes. It doesn’t appear to make the always-on display any brighter. Now, this could be due to the fact that both devices are not running final software, so we’ll be sure to update this review if we notice any changes.

No, the G6 doesn’t have an OLED panel, but it’s still incredibly vibrant, colorful and a joy to use. Lanh and I both agree there’s a massive difference between the LG G5 and LG G6 displays and thankfully, there’s no light bleed either, which we’ve noticed on many other LCD panels.

Overall, there’s a lot to like about the LG G6 display. Thanks to HDR and Dolby Vision support, it’s at least future-proofed for a few years to come. It may not be the most accurate screen, nor an AMOLED panel, but LG has done more than enough to convince us that 18:9 is the future of smartphone screens and not just a gimmick.

Performance

It flies… like a G6

Some people may be disappointed that the LG G6 isn’t powered by the Snapdragon 835, but we’ve really had no issues with performance; the handset handles everything you can throw at it. While performance may be affected by carrier bloat, the unlocked version certainly delivers as far as performance goes. As Lanh put it: it flies… like a G6.

Hardware

PSA: Not all LG G6s are created equal

News

For users in the US, there’s no Quad DAC or model with more than 32GB of storage, but there is wireless charging; the G6 supports both WPC and PMA wireless charging standards. Finally, there’s also a dual SIM model for select markets, again with varying configurations depending on the market. It’s not the first time LG has done this – the LG G5 was also segregated with the B&O Play module not coming to the US at all – and LG tells us it is down to local markets to decide exactly which features the handset gets. For users in Europe and most countries, you’ll get the global model without the additional bells and whistles.

Next to the USB Type-C port on the bottom, you’ll find the single speaker. It seems loud for a single speaker, but like all bottom-mounted speakers, you can block it when using it in one-hand in landscape mode. Putting the audio setup through our testing, we find the speaker has loudness of 63.2dB, which is lower than most flagships and significantly lower than the LG G5 which scored 72.8dB.

The headphone jack outputs at 0.396 volts, which is low compared to many phones but better than the LG G5 (0.313 volts), while the noise level of -95.5dBA is on par with most flagships as well. Overall, the audio experience may not seem the best on paper, but it doesn’t disappoint in actual usage. While we would have liked dual stereo-speakers, it is certainly more than acceptable as it is.

Battery life

The LG G6 delivers flagship-worthy battery life

Overall, battery enthusiasts might be disappointed at the lack of a removable battery in the LG G6 but the hefty boost in capacity, coupled with software enhancements and a reliable processing package certainly delivers flagship-worthy battery life. Whatever your usage, the LG G6 should see you through at least a full day’s use.

Camera

Parity between the two cameras is arguably my favorite thing about the LG G6 camera; the LG G5 and the V20 both have a large disparity between the two sensors, with the regular sensor capturing 16MP images while the wide-angle shoots at 8MP. As a result, there’s a noticeable difference in the quality of images captured by both sensors and as LG correctly identified, it made the wide-angle camera the “secondary” camera. As they told us, providing parity between the two cameras means both cameras are now main cameras, and from our time with the LG G6, it certainly delivers on this claim.

They might share the same resolution count but the two cameras are behind two very different lenses; the standard angle is an f/1.8 aperture lens with optical image stabilization and 71-degree field of view while the wide-angle is an f/2.4 lens with 125-degree field of view, which is lacking in both OIS and autofocus. That’s not the only change from last year, with LG also opting to drop the color spectrum sensor as well as swapping out laser autofocus for phase detection autofocus, which works just as well, if not better.

The camera tweaks don’t stop there as LG has also added a new square camera that’s perfect for Instagram and comes with a few different modes built into it. One allows you to snap a photo and immediately see a preview of it on the bottom half of the screen while another lets you take multiple photos or short clips that the camera will stitch together automatically. For those who like putting four photos together in a collage, you can take four different photos in the grid shot mode and the camera will do all the heavy lifting.

Both Lanh and I agree that our favourite is the guide shot mode, which allows you to use a premade template or a previous photo as a guide for taking another photo with the same framing or composition. Once you dig into guide shot however, you see that you can also take multiple shots and turn them into a GIF at the press of a button; it’s a hidden feature that only shows up once you take multiple shots in guide shot mode, but it’s by far my favorite feature of the square camera.

For vloggers, video lovers or those who want a little more control over their video, the LG G6’s video recording capabilities definitely deliver

New to the LG G-series is full manual video controls which, until now, had been exclusive to LG’s flagship V-series. Now it looks like LG has finally given users exactly what they wanted. Compared to manual video controls on other smartphones, the LG G6 is miles ahead, with features like focus peaking, hi-fi audio recording and a wind noise filter all making it on-board. For vloggers, video lovers or those who want a little more control over their video, the LG G6’s video recording capabilities definitely deliver.

Without doubt, the LG G6 camera is a lot of fun to use, especially thanks to the wide-angle lens which can really take some breathtaking shots. It’s amazing how much you can fit into the frame over the standard telephoto lens. The quality of the photos themselves are impressive, with excellent detail, vibrant colors, great contrast and overall good dynamic range. There’s a noticeable lack of issues with overexposure of highlights and crushing of shadows that were prevalent in previous LG cameras, so it’s clear the Korean OEM has certainly made a lot of progress with its algorithms and processing.

As fun as the wide-angle lens is, it’s not great in low light which is to be expected from the narrower aperture and lack of OIS compared to the main sensor. In low light conditions, we recommend using the regular angle which can take some equally fantastic shots and produces a much sharper, more colourful and much cleaner image over the wide-angle lens. I personally feel that there’s still a lot to be desired from the low-light performance on the G6, but given this is pre-final software, I’m basing my concerns on that, especially as Lanh’s handset performs much better in low-light conditions.

On the front, you’ve got a 5MP camera which has a wide 100-degree field of view and you can swap between narrow and wide angles, which makes it perfect for group shots. In daylight, this is more than capable, although highlights are often blown out and shots tend to fall apart and are mostly unusable in less-than-ideal lighting conditions. This isn’t overly surprising given it’s the front -facing camera, but something to keep in mind nonetheless.

Overall, the LG G6 camera is a joy to use, and, given the right conditions, it can take truly breathtaking photos. It’s not perfect – no smartphone is, after all – but it delivers quality in abundance. Whether it’s the square camera fun, the two angles or the manual video controls, there’s a lot to like about the LG G6 camera.

The LG G6 camera is a joy to use, and, given the right conditions, it can take truly breathtaking photos

Software

The new icons are designed to complement the rounded corners of the display. While Lanh likes them for the uniformity they provide, I personally don’t like them and prefer the natural design of icons. Thankfully, LG provides an option in the home screen settings to display the icons without the backgrounds. This is also where you can enable the app drawer, although it is not enabled by default.

Press and hold the on-screen home key and you’ll no longer get Google Now as in previous years; instead, the LG G6 is the first non-Pixel Android phone to run Google’s Assistant out of the box and provides some very-welcome competition for Google’s flagship Pixel XL. Sure, Assistant is available on other devices running Nougat and Marshmallow, which takes the shine off it being available on the LG G6, but it’s a nice feature to have nonetheless.

As part of its push towards the 18:9 screen, LG has also updated its app to show off what’s possible with the new aspect ratio. Apps like the calendar and weather both really show off the two squares stacked on top of each other and the calendar especially, is fantastic in landscape mode. The apps also conform more to Google’s Material Design guidelines than previous years and fit the overall Android experience very well.

With Nougat on board, the 18:9 form factor shows just how good it is for multitasking with the split-view in Nougat proving to be a lot more useful on an 18:9 aspect ratio than the traditional 16:9 ratio, mainly due to the extra amount you can see in each app.

Android Nougat review: what’s new in Android 7.1.2?

Features

Overall, LG’s software has come a long way over the past few years, and the UX 6.0 running on the G6 continues this trend. LG has worked hard to optimize the software for the smoothest experience, there’s very little bloat on our unlocked units and LG’s own apps and wallpapers are fantastic at showing off the new 18:9-aspect ratio on the screen.

Specifications

LG has certainly nailed it with the G6

After the failures of last year, and with the LG V20 still not available in Europe, LG desperately needed the G6 to restore some balance. To do this, they’ve gone back to basics and focused on the things that truly matter to create a solid all-round smartphone, and they’ve certainly nailed it with the G6.

It performs well, has an excellent camera, flagship-worthy battery life and features that people want, such as wireless charging and water resistance. The new 18:9 screen pushes the envelope of smartphone functionality and combined with the super slim bezels, LG has proven that a big display doesn’t have to mean a big phone.

If you’ve been wanting a phablet in a comfortable form factor, look no further than the LG G6.

2024 is shaping up to be a fantastic year for Android smartphones. With Samsung, Apple, HUAWEI and others all expected to bring the very best they have this year, the G6 needed to be a success. Luckily, it does just this, and by setting a new standard for flagships in 2023, LG has laid down a marker that other OEMs need to equal or surpass. Simply put, LG’s G6 represents the future of what we should expect from a flagship smartphone.

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What Will Openai’s Chatgpt Professional Look Like?

Introduction

OpenAI’s ChatGPT is a state-of-the-art language model that has been trained on a massive amount of text data. It is capable of generating human-like text, answering questions, and engaging in conversations. Recently, OpenAI announced that they are developing a professional version of ChatGPT, which will be designed for use in the business world. The professional version of ChatGPT is expected to take the capabilities of the current model to a whole new level, with new features and capabilities that will make it even more powerful and useful for businesses. In this article, we will take a closer look at what the professional version of ChatGPT will look like and explore its potential applications and impact on the business world.

Key features of the professional version

The professional version of ChatGPT is expected to have a number of new features and capabilities that will make it even more powerful and useful for businesses. Some of the key features that are expected to be included in the professional version include:

Improved accuracy and language understanding: The professional version of ChatGPT will be trained on even more data and fine-tuned for specific industries and use cases, resulting in a higher level of accuracy and a better understanding of language and context.

Advanced customization and integration capabilities: The professional version of ChatGPT will have more flexibility in terms of customization and integration with other systems, allowing businesses to tailor the model to their specific needs and use cases.

Additional pre-trained models for specific industries and use cases: OpenAI will provide additional pre-trained models for specific industries, such as finance, healthcare, and customer service, to enable businesses to quickly and easily deploy the model for their specific use cases.

Enhanced privacy and security features: The professional version of ChatGPT will be built with enhanced privacy and security features to protect sensitive data and ensure compliance with industry regulations.

Overall, the professional version of ChatGPT is expected to offer a more sophisticated, customizable, and secure solution for businesses looking to leverage the power of AI for natural language processing tasks.

Potential applications of the professional version

The professional version of ChatGPT is expected to have a wide range of potential applications in the business world. Some of the most notable potential applications include:

Customer service and support: The professional version of ChatGPT can be used to power chatbots and virtual assistants for customer service and support. Businesses can use the model to automate repetitive tasks, such as answering frequently asked questions and provide 24/7 customer service.

Content creation and marketing: The professional version of ChatGPT can be used to generate high-quality, human-like content for websites, social media, and other marketing channels. Businesses can use the model to create blog posts, product descriptions, email campaigns, and more.

Business intelligence and data analysis: The professional version of ChatGPT can be used to extract insights and intelligence from large amounts of unstructured data, such as customer reviews and social media posts. This can help businesses gain a deeper understanding of their customers, competitors, and market trends.

Language Translation: The professional version of ChatGPT can be used to translate languages, this can help businesses to reach a wider audience and provide customer service in multiple languages

Virtual Event management: The professional version of ChatGPT can be used to power virtual event assistants, allowing attendees to ask questions and get information in real time during virtual events.

Education: The professional version of ChatGPT can be used to assist students and teachers in e-learning environments, provide personalized answers, and help with research and assignments.

Research and Development: The professional version of ChatGPT can be used to aid research and development teams in various industries by providing insights, summaries, and analysis of technical documents and research papers.

Healthcare: The professional version of ChatGPT can be used to provide medical information and answer patients’ questions, it can also be used to assist doctors and nurses in their daily tasks, such as scheduling and documentation.

Legal: The professional version of ChatGPT can be used to assist legal professionals with legal research and document review, and improve their workflow by automating repetitive tasks.

These Apps Will Connect You With Like

Being an entrepreneur can be a lonely existence. With long hours and hectic schedules, it can be incredibly difficult to find time to spend with loved ones. What’s even worse is that finding and making friends becomes downright impossible without apps. Fortunately, there’s a wide range of social apps that are designed to help you disconnect from work and meet people with similar interests.

With so much of our lives spent working, it’s easy to forget to interact with others — whether it be through social events, hobbies, or other activities that truly enrich our lives. Here are some popular apps that’ll get you off the internet and out socializing:

Meetup connects people who share the same interests. It shows upcoming events and activities in your area, so you can meet with others who are interested in the same event.

It’s not only a fun way to meet new people, but it provides you with instant conversation material to build up social skills and relationships in a much more comfortable way. Meetup also encourages business networking by allowing you to create and promote professional networking events.

When you’re working and traveling, it can be hard to find the time to schedule social events. Time to Enjoy prevents you from missing out on some great social experiences by comparing your work schedule and calendar with events that are coming up.

This way, you won’t miss out on events that will get you out of the house (or the hotel), and you can meet new people or old friends despite my hectic work schedule.

GoTribe is both an online and offline community designed to make fitness and wellness a social event and a fun lifestyle. Now in use in over nine countries and 12 states, the app connects you with “workout buddies” so you can provide each other with encouragement and come together in person to get in shape.

You can use this to help balance work with your physical health and find other like-minded individuals to go exercise with when you’re on a business trip.

This app is great for foodies. With Supper Club, you can set up a group outing to a new restaurant or host a social dinner party at a nearby eatery.

The app also hosts its own events that you can attend in various cities around the country. You can use it to organize dinners for my employees, special occasions, and even client meetings.

Golden connects you with volunteer opportunities and other people who enjoy volunteering. You can even choose to invite friends to volunteer for an upcoming event.

This makes it easy to get out there and do something good for your community while allowing you to meet new people who share the same passion for social consciousness. You can even encourage others in your company to volunteer, so you’ll use this app as a way to set up those events.

City Socializer is another great way to locate people who share the same interests as you. The app provides an extensive list of social groups and organizations that you can join in your city and information on upcoming events by interest.

On business trips, you can have a great time finding other people who love doing what you do. It’s a great way to fill in some free time rather than sitting in your hotel room.

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