Trending February 2024 # Pixel Piracy Review – A Great Pirate Game In The Making # Suggested March 2024 # Top 8 Popular

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Pixel Piracy is one great indie game that I came across recently. It doesn’t have great graphics, or even a good control, but it is one game that had me stuck in it for hours every day for the past 2 weeks.

Created by Vitali Kirpu and produced by Alexander Poysky, Pixel Piracy is a side-scrolling 2d, real time strategy/sandbox/simulation game where you are a pirate controlling your crews and ship. Don’t be fooled by the 2d graphics, as the game is tough and punishing, yet addicting at the same time.

Getting started

There are three modes to choose from: Princess (starts with 600 golds), Hardcore (500 golds and increased price of goods) and Arena where you pit yourself against countless pirates.

When you first start the game, you are given a few pieces of wood to build your own raft. You are also given some gold (depending on the level of difficulty you have selected) to hire crew, buy weapons, food, books, etc. Most of the stuff, especially the crew, are expensive, so it is important for you to manage your money well and get only the essentials.

Once you have your ship and crew ready, you can go to the World map and set sail to pillage other pirate ships or islands.

Rather than a simple combat and pillage game, Pixel Piracy is really more of a simulation game where you have to micro-manage every aspect of the game. You will have situations where your crew (and you) pooped all over the ship and you have to (buy a book and) teach them how to clean up the poop. The same goes for cooking, cannoning, fishing etc. There are also game points, also known as TP, that you can use to increase the statistics of your crew so they can live longer and fight better during combat.

Mentioning the crew, they come in various professions and have different traits. Some of them are honest and cheerful while some others are traitors, greedy, lazy etc. You won’t be able to view the traits and attributes until you have hired them, so it is hit or miss. In addition, you have to manage their hunger and morale and have to pay them regularly to keep them happy. All these added up to your financial management skill. Not to mention that they will die, too, during combat.

Gameplay

The best thing about Pixel Piracy is that it is open-ended and there is no storyline at all. All the maps are randomly generated and you make decisions along the way. I did mention that the game is tough. Indeed, it is unforgiving. If you die during combat (and you will die very easily), it is game over for you. If your crews were injured during combat, and you didn’t get the bandages from the town, you will see them bleed to death, leaving you with nothing.

The tutorial is pretty basic. It only guides you through the controls and various icons on the screen. For the rest of the things, you have to figure it out yourself. It took me quite a while to figure out how to build my first raft. Sometimes during the combat you realize that you are missing some stuff, like you need to have bandages in your Inventory, and you will have to start a new game to get it right.

Game Control Getting Pixel Piracy

Pixel Piracy is still in beta stage, and for a game in beta, it is damn good and shows great promise. Pixel Piracy early access is now available on Steam at a price of $14.99. It is available for Windows, Mac and Linux. This is one game you surely don’t want to miss out on.

Damien

Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

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Dark Souls 2 Review: An Addictive Puzzle Wrapped In A Nightmarish Pc Action Game

Dark Souls II is here, and it’s just as hard as its predecessor. We’ve gone through the seven stages of grief and come out the other side to say that, well, it’s pretty damn good. Great, even.

This review was originally published March 11 for the Xbox 360. Updated April 24 with PC impressions.

It’s no secret the original Dark Souls was lacking when it came to the PC port. Locked at a blurry 1024×720 resolution and a subpar 30 frames per second, the Dark Souls port hearkened back to lackluster PC ports of old. It wasn’t long before the mod community fixed the problems, but From Software’s initial effort was, frankly, bad. So we thought it prudent to check in on Dark Souls II for the PC release and see if From Software learned its lesson.

Verdict: Absolutely.

The PC port of Dark Souls II features a wealth of not just graphical options but control scheme tweaks also. It’s still not a gorgeous game, by any means. That pre-release footage? Dark Souls II on PC does not look like that footage.

But there’s no doubt this is the definitive version of Dark Souls II. If you have the option to skip the console version and go for the PC, do so. The game supports any resolution that your system supports, and you’d be amazed (or maybe not) what even a middling implementation of anti-aliasing can do for the game. Oh, and the game scales up to 60 frames per second like a proper PC title.

The PC version of Dark Souls II is clearer, smoother, and (quite simply) better in every way.

As far as the game itself? Everything remains the same as the console version—which you can read in the review below.

Original review:

There’s an unspoken rule of reviewing games: You finish the game before you review it. It doesn’t matter how good, how bad, or how buggy the game is—you do your damnedest to see the credits.

I will never finish Dark Souls II.

Since attaining my review copy of Dark Souls II I have ranted. I have raved. I have screamed obscenities at my Xbox 360. I have slammed my hand on my desk in rage. I have drank. I have become resigned. I have shut off the console in a fit of rage. I have ruefully turned the console back on mere moments later to try my hand once more.

Imagine this pit is Dark Souls II and that’s me at the top. I will never make it to the bottom of this pit alive.

“This is Dark Souls,” the game reminds you upon your very first demise, the achievement popping onto the screen like an extra punch in the face. Like its predecessors, Dark Souls II is an ultra-hard third-person “action” game where you’ll spend quite a bit of time dead, staring at loading screens.

You’re cursed, a person who feasts on other creatures’ souls to hold onto your humanity. Even fifteen hours into the game I have very little clue what the story is—something about a magic kingdom of Drangleic that crumbled to ruins. You’ll wander through these ruins, looking for something important.

Pretty ruins.

Mostly you’ll fight your way through a veritable army of enemies that want you dead. These enemies range from small demon pigs to enormous serpents that spit fire at you. Combat is fairly realistic, governed by a stamina meter that always runs out right when you need it most, leaving you to get murdered by a giant’s ill-timed sword blow.

Condemned to repeat it

For two hours, Dark Souls II became the same stretch of ruin for me. First I’d run up the stone stairs from the bonfire I’d lit, which served as a respawn point. I’d murder the waiting giant with the longsword. Then I’d walk up more stairs and get murdered by the giant with the oversized mace.

Finally I killed the giant with the longsword so many times he disappeared forever. This is a new mechanic in Dark Souls II to prevent players from grinding low-level areas for hours on end—after you kill enemies a certain number of times they disappear. Each enemy is different, clearly, since once I defeated the giant with the mace a single time he never came back.

Enemies only spawn a certain number of times to prevent grinding.

So then Dark Souls II became run up the stairs from the bonfire, run past these two empty areas, run past the giant with the longsword who wouldn’t attack unless I got too close, sprint down the crumbled remains of a once-proud walkway, and enter the circular arena area.

Inside the arena were three giants—two with swords, one with an enormous cleaver. And, inevitably, the cleaver guy would kill me. So I’d run all the way back to him, desperately try to pick up my souls off the ground before he killed me again, and then get killed again. And killed again. And killed again.

Breathe. Think of the calm, green grove. Let go of your frustration. Get murdered by the enemy just off-screen here.

Even when I beat Cleaver Man, one of his sword buddies would smack me down. But I started to learn. Despite my instinct to play safe and stay back from the giant, I found it was smarter to get in close—he couldn’t maneuver as well, and I could get out of the way faster. And so I started winning more often.

This. This is what Dark Souls is really about.

Dark Souls II looks like an action game, but it is not. It is a puzzle game. It is about outsmarting opponents—about learning and exploiting patterns, about gaining something from failures, about solving disparate problems with a limited and underpowered skill set.

There’s still nothing else like it. Despite From Software’s claims of making the game “more accessible,” Dark Souls II is simply an extension of Dark Souls—nothing more, nothing less. Some of the items seem better explained than previous games, and the menus a bit clearer, but that’s about it in the “accessibility” department.

Nothing else like it.

The playable classes have been revamped. Gone is the newcomer-friendly pyromancer class from Dark Souls. I played as a Warrior, because I like the sword-and-shield dynamic, but there seems to be a class fit for any range of magic-and-melee you choose to employ.

Characters can now equip three weapons on each hand, allowing you a bit more flexibility to hot-swap in the middle of battle. The camera also seems improved from the last game. Locking on to an enemy no longer left me staring at a wall in the midst of a tense fight, which is appreciated.

Covenants—pacts that regularly draw you in to participate in the game’s unique “invasion”-style multiplayer, where players drop into each other’s worlds to help or murder each other—also look to play a bigger role in Dark Souls II. Even the first area you enter gives you the option to join a covenant, warning that it will set you on an “arduous path.”

You can fast travel right from the beginning of the game this time around, a handy addition since you no longer level up at bonfires. Instead you’ll have to travel back to the town of Majula and speak to the Emerald Herald to boost those stats.

The trademark invasion-style multiplayer makes a return here, though it’s balanced a bit better than before.

Oh, and if you die the game just gets harder. Did I mention that? Each time you die, you lose humanity. This, in turn, leaves you with fewer health points. In previous games the tradeoff was that you couldn’t be invaded by enemy players. As a result, many people played through Dark Souls in the “hollow” state to avoid online interactions.

Well now you can be invaded even while undead, and you’ll have fewer hit points. So it sucks all around. Might as well burn those human effigies and return some of your humanity before it’s too late.

Worth the wait?

The PC version of Dark Souls II was delayed until April 25, so I played on the Xbox 360. While Dark Souls has never been a graphical powerhouse, it’s particularly jarring to go back to the old hardware now.

Even playing through my 24″ monitor, Dark Souls II is rough. Screen-tearing and aliasing abound, and many textures are comparable to late-PS2 era. It’s not something that will significantly impact your enjoyment—Dark Souls has always been more focused on mechanics than graphics—but it’s something of note if you’re debating whether to wait for the PC version.

Three enemies at once? Good luck.

It’s especially frustrating because there’s so much promise to the graphics. Ruin-dotted vistas look downright gorgeous in the pale-orange sunset glow of Drangleic. And then you move the camera and for a second it’s an aliased, screen-tearing mess, and you wish you were playing on a better system.

Bottom line

April 25 can’t come soon enough. Maybe I’ll turn on my ailing 360 just one more time tonight…

Review: Synology Nas, A Solid Backup Solution And Great Home Media Server With Plex

I’ve recently been testing the brand new Synology DS-216+ NAS ($299), a network-attached-storage product meant for consumers. Although Synology products include a variety of features, I will be focusing on two primary functions that I consider most essential and most useful to people today: Mac backup and home media management (TV shows and movies).

With Apple no longer shipping optical drives in most of their products, I think now is a great time to convert your home movie collection of DVDs and Blu-rays to digital files, which a NAS is great for storing. The Apple TV 4 was another big factor: with an app, I can now view all the TV shows and movies, stored on my NAS, from my TV.

Before I owned a NAS, I was worried about two things: whether the features would be useful and how much hassle would be necessary to get everything up and running. Hence, my review starts with an explanation of the setup steps involved …

Hardware Setup

At its dumbest, the Synology NAS is a USB hard drive. At its smartest, it’s an always-on network computer that handles a wide array of data, media and backup tasks. For any of this stuff, though, you need hard drives for storage. When you buy a Synology, you typically buy it standalone with empty drive bays.

This means the first task to getting the NAS configured is to decide what kind of hard drives you want: speed, capacity, reliability, manufacturer and such. You can get away with any consumer OEM 3.5 inch drive really, it’s personal preference.

Anything from Amazon will suffice for home consumer needs. Storage capacity depends on what you plan to use the NAS for, of course. Given the ever-falling price of HDDs however, it’s pretty cheap to pickup several terabytes worth of space. To get started quickly, I’d suggest getting two equal-sized drives from the same manufacturer. For my setup, I went with 2 x 3 TB WD-Red NAS drives from Western Digital, costing about $200 in total.

Installing the drives into the Synology is very easy. The main NAS caddy contains two bays. Take one of the bays out and remove the side strips. Then, slide a hard drive snugly into the bay. Re-attach the side strips to secure the hard drive in place, and then slide the whole lot back into the Synology. Just make sure to insert the bays the right way up and you can basically do no wrong — there’s a right-side-up indicator engraved into the plastic. Looking at naked hard drives can be scary for some, but installation into the NAS is very straightforward and simple. The clever design of the Synology bays eliminates the need for screws, or any tools at all.

Aside from hard drive installation, the Synology hardware is as simple to configure as any other home appliance. Plug in the Ethernet and power cord, then switch it on.

Software Setup

Before I tested this unit, I wasn’t sure what to expect with regard to setup. I knew about the easy-to-switch drive bays, but I had this feeling that the software configuration would be finicky and annoying. For the most part, I was very wrong. Setting up the Synology system is a breeze. After plugging in the unit, you visit a special website URL that acts as the web setup portal for the NAS. There’s a fair amount of waiting for initial loading to complete, but generally you just tick the boxes and progress.

Time Machine backup setup is a bit more intricate. You have to do things like create a new user, add a Shared Folder, allocate X GB of space to the Time Machine client, etcetera. Could Synology design this setup to be simpler? Does it really matter? Probably not. Like with Plex, the steps only needs to be done once and then it can be left to its own devices. On the Mac side, OS X sees the Synology just like a Time Capsule, as another Time Machine destination with the size allocated as defined in the setup.

Obviously, there is a lot more the Synology can do beyond Plex and Time Machine. You can run your own email mailbox, host a web server on it, replace Apple Photos and much more. I want to focus on media and backup in this review because that’s what I find most compelling … and that’s what I use it for every day. I think the important takeaway is none of this is as hard or as scary as the alphabet soup of acronyms could imply. It could be simpler, for sure, but you really shouldn’t see it as a barrier to adoption. With setup over, it’s time to look at what using the Synology as a home NAS is like. Spoiler: It’s pretty great.

Using Plex and Synology as a Media Server

Loading content into Plex is straightforward. It’s a simple matter of dragging and dropping media files into the designated folder on the Synology. Plex will happily import most file formats, as it automatically transcodes the content on-the-fly to optimize the viewing experience for whatever device you are using to watch.

To help Plex attach the correct metadata, it is recommended to name files in a certain way. For instance, films must be labelled like ‘Daddy’s Home (2024)’. The rules are very simple — read the documentation on this for more information. Acquiring such content is the real tricky bit here: the official method is to rip your movies from optical media, using a disc drive and HandBrake. Obviously, there are other avenues to find TV shows and theatre films digitally. I’ll leave that as an exercise for the reader.

A big draw for me was the Apple TV compatibility. With older Apple TV models, you had to jailbreak to get some semblance of a Plex interface. With Apple TV 4, Plex can simply offer an official client in the App Store as a free download. The app is great. The home screen displays shortcuts to the different libraries, shows and films that were only half-watched in a previous sitting (so you can quickly continue watching), and new unwatched episodes of a series (‘On Deck’).

The UI uses TVML extensively, meaning that the components and grids mirror Apple’s system apps. The app is logically structured, with shows separated by season. You can also just press Play at the show level and it will pick up where you left off. The detail views look good, assuming you have correct metadata for your content.

Big, blurred, poster art act as the backdrop for ratings, description info and other details alongside a cast list in the sidebar. Use the navigation bar at the top of the page for a myriad of discovery options including the ability to view your movie collection based on cinema air date, not just when the title was added to the Plex library. Plex also generates related recommendations for other movies in your library, automatically finding films by other actors or directors that you own.

The downside to Plex being based on TVML is that it can be slow to load on occasion. For example, after finishing a TV show, the whole page has to visibly reload so that everything is up to date. I think a truly native app would not have these issues. It is also easy to get lost in a deep navigational hierarchy, where the only path of action to get back is to spam-press the Home button to eventually return to the main screen.

Overall, these are minor niggles. I love the Plex Apple TV app. It even supports the Apple TV’s Top Shelf feature, so if you put the app on the first row of your Home Screen, it will display dynamic ‘Recently Added’ and ‘Continue Watching’ content in the shelf area.

Using Synology with Time Machine

With regards to using the Synology as a Time Machine box, there isn’t too much to say as the premise of Time Machine is that it gets out of your way. After doing the aforementioned setup, the Synology appears as a target drive in the Mac Time Machine preferences. It then proceeds to automatically backup at regular intervals. If you disconnect from the network and rejoin, it does the intelligent thing and remounts the drive without user intervention.

I have used standard USB network-connected drives with Time Machine before and have always encountered some friction or annoyances. The Synology works flawlessly. I haven’t had to troubleshoot anything since setting it up. The folder rollback feature on the Mac (where you enter the single-window timeline mode) does not seem to work with the Synology Time Machine’s implementation. I don’t really care about that though: for me, Time Machine is used as a straightforward, automatic, backup only. I have tested the restore to another Mac from Synology and it completed successfully, seamlessly.

My only criticism is that, whilst a Time Machine backup is happening, the Synology gets noisy as the hard drives spin up. If you store the Synology in a cupboard or basement, then this is a non-issue. If you keep the NAS in your living room, this is something to consider. Outside of Time Machine operations, the machine is barely audible.

Conclusion

Getting a Synology NAS has dramatically improved my life. I’ve only scratched the surface of what it can do, of course. In the future, I want to experiment with using the Download Station functionality, so it will automatically grab files from RSS feeds whilst I sleep. There’s so much more possible with a home NAS beyond backup and media server. But those two features alone are fantastic and make it worth a purchase for me.

The Synology DS-216+, the unit I reviewed, is available to buy for $299. Synology offers many different models, with differing feature sets and number of drives, for respectively more or less money. Compare all the available models on the Synology website.

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How To Take A Screenshot On Pixel 7 And Pixel 7 Pro

You may not think about it, but one of the most common features of a smartphone is the ability to take a screenshot. Over the years, the methods for taking these screenshots has changed for various reasons. Whether it’s because of the addition (or subtraction) of buttons, or new software features, the methods for taking a screenshot has changed.

How to Take a Screenshot on Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro

This trend continues with Google’s latest flagship smartphone, however, you won’t need to jump through a bunch of hoops if you want to take a screenshot on Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro. The first option for taking a screenshot is the tried and true method that relies on your phone’s hardware buttons.

Navigate to the screen that you want to take a screenshot of.

Press the Power and Volume Down buttons at the same time.

Your phone’s screen will flash.

Once you have successfully taken a screenshot on Pixel 7 or Pixel 7 Pro, a preview appears in the bottom left corner. You can swipe this away and have it sent straight to the Screenshots folder within Google Photos. Or, you can tap the screenshot preview to make any edits or share it using any of the apps installed on your phone.

How to Take a Scrolling Screenshot on Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro

Another feature that has been available with some Android phones, but only recently made its way to Google’s flavor of Android is the ability to take a “scrolling screenshot”. This essentially allows you to capture more content from a page or an app, that isn’t actually visible without scrolling up or down.

Navigate to the screen that you want to take a screenshot of.

Press the Power and Volume Down buttons at the same time.

Your phone’s screen will flash.

When the screenshot preview appears in the bottom left corner, so will an extended menu. This was introduced with Android 12, and is also available on Android 13, giving users a few more options if they want to take a screenshot on Pixel 7.

From the extended menu next to your screenshot preview, tap the Capture more button.

Use the on-screen crop guidelines to capture additional content for your screenshot.

This might come in handy if you need to share a long thread of messages, or want to share a larger (or longer) graphic from your Pixel 7. Once you have finished “capturing more” in the screenshot, tap the Save button in the top left corner if you want to save it to your gallery, or you can tap the Share icon in the top right to share it instantly.

Take a Screenshot on Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro Without Buttons

Google is constantly making changes and improvements to its flavor of Android, providing users with plenty of alternative methods to perform various tasks. This includes being able to take a screenshot on Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro, as you can do so without using any of your device’s hardware buttons. Instead, you can do so right from the App Switcher on your Pixel 7, regardless of whether you use gesture navigation or the traditional 3-button navigation.

Gesture Navigation:

Swipe up and hold from the bottom of your Pixel 7’s screen.

Scroll left or right until you find the app that you want to screenshot. Make sure that you don’t select the app from the multitasking menu.

Tap the Screenshot button at the bottom of the multitasking window.

3-button navigation:

Tap the Overview button in your navigation bar.

Scroll left or right until you find the app that you want to screenshot. Make sure that you don’t select the app from the multitasking menu.

Tap the Screenshot button at the bottom of the multitasking window.

Take a screenshot on Pixel 7 with Quick Tap

One of the more unique features that were introduced back in 2023, was the ability to perform various tasks using Quick Tap. Essentially, this allows you to assign a shortcut, then double-tap the back of your Pixel phone in order to perform and execute whatever you selected. This is one of those features that can be seen as an Accessibility improvement but can also be used if you want to a screenshot on Pixel 7.

Open the Settings app on your Pixel 7 or Pixel 7 Pro.

Scroll down and tap System.

Tap Gestures.

At the top of the page, tap Quick Tap to start actions.

Next to Use Quick Tap, tap the toggle to enable the feature.

Under the Tap back of phone twice to section, select Take screenshot.

If necessary, scroll down and toggle Require stronger taps to the On position.

If you are someone who uses a case with your Pixel 7 or Pixel 7 Pro, you might want to enable the Require stronger taps option. This just makes the feature a bit more sensitive, resulting in you being able to take a screenshot on Pixel 7 easier when using Quick Tap.

Review: Twelve South Hirise For Apple Watch—An Unassuming Charging Dock And A Great Stand

Apple Watch stands are multiplying like rabbits and getting more useful. Today, I get to tell you all about the HiRise for Apple Watch.

This is one of the first stands for Apple’s wearable device and the very first watch stand from Twelve South, a company based in Charleston, South Carolina which has been designing premium accessories exclusively for use with Apple devices.

Like their popular HiRise stand for iPhone and iPad, the Apple Watch edition helps protect your device while it’s charging. And like other Twelve South products, it looks gorgeous and was designed to support all Apple Watch sizes, models and bands.

But is it worth your attention? Read on for all the details.

The accessory comes in two colors.

It’s compatible with the aluminum, stainless steel and gold editions of the Apple Watch, regardless of their size (38mm or 42mm). And it works with any Apple-designed band material.

The gizmo is made from metal but uses soft silicone to protect the areas where your Apple Watch and its band touch the HiRise. It hides the charging cable from sight, which helps declutter your desktop. And it’s perfect for both using the Apple Watch while it’s charging and keeping it at your bedside during overnight charging.

Packaging

As is Twelve South’s wont, the HiRise for Apple Watch ships in a nicely designed box. The beauty of this particular box is even more pronounced given Apple’s own stylish product packaging for the Apple Watch. The box contains the HiRise for Apple Watch in several pieces that must be assembled, accompanied by the quick instruction manual.

Design

The HiRise for Apple Watch is made from brushed metal and available in silver and black. Silver is the perfect match for the baseline aluminum Apple Watch while the black may look better with Space Gray watches. Although Twelve South’s HiRise for iPhone and iPad also comes in gold, this option is not available for the Apple Watch edition of the stand.

The accessory’s base is made from metal and has a non-slip rubber base to keep your HiRise in place. The use of metal gives the HiRise just enough weight and sturdiness so you won’t accidentally send the whole thing flying off your nightstand when you hit snooze in the morning.

A soft, leather landing pad behind the support post protects your band and buckle.

And thanks to silicone accents, at no time will your wearable gizmo and its band make contact with the HiRise’s metal parts—a particular concern for owners of the easily-scratched stainless steel Apple Watch models.

Setup

Like the previous HiRise accessories, the Apple Watch edition of the HiRise comes in pieces that must be assembled yourself: the base, the support bar that fits angled onto the base and actually holds your watch and a leather-coated cover.

But don’t worry, the four-step assembly process is anything but intimidating and only takes only a minute or two. You will basically use the included Allen wrench and the screw to optionally secure the support bar at 73 degrees to the base of the HiRise.

You will next run the cord for Apple Watch’s inductive charging puck down the back of the support pad using the pre-cut groove and route it tightly through the base pad, before it exits at the back.

Now cover the base’s embedded cable management with the included part that also acts as a leather landing pad that cradles your Apple Watch band.

Lastly, put the magnetic charging puck into the cutout of the support pad and your HiRise is ready to go. I was pleasantly surprised with the simplicity of the assembly process. Everything worked out nicely for me, even the charging puck snapped smoothly into a silicone-lined cutout (its concave side must face outwards).

Removing the charging cable from the HiRise is a simple matter of popping the charging disk out and releasing the cord.

Twelve South provides a charming little walkthrough tutorial of the assembly process so anyone can do it, really. Aside from the included Allen wrench and the screw, no other tool is required to assemble your HiRise.

Functionality

The HiRise’s mount suspenses your wearable device in portrait mode at 73 degrees, making it appear as if it’s floating in mid-air and at just the right height for you to be able to interact safely with the device while it’s charging.

The tilted angle lets you easily check the time at a glance while lying in bed, see alerts while glancing over at a countertop, showcase the device to friends when you aren’t wearing it and more.

There’s a rectangular cutout on the support bar which lets you place your watch on the HiRise with the band fastened or with it flat and open, depending on your preference.

The charging disk pops out in an instant and its cord removes literally in seconds. And it only takes a minute or two to unscrew the HiRise’s support bar, making the HiRise a friendly travel companion.

Issues

I don’t have any major gripes with this accessory, but I nonetheless feel like mentioning a few pain points of sorts that I think should need addressing.

For starters—and this is probably a biggie—the HiRise for Apple Watch isn’t compatible with the upcoming Nightstand mode, a feature of watchOS 2 that lets you use the device as an alarm clock in landscape while it’s charging on its side.

Like many stands that had been designed before Apple announced watchOS 2, the HiRise elevates your watch in portrait mode. “We are not planning to upgrade the HiRise,” to make it compatible with watchOS 2’s Nightstand mode, Twelve South tells me via email. You can get a Nightstand mode of sorts on your watch with the HiRise now actually and Twelve South’s how-to details the process.

Another improvement I would like to see implemented in a future iteration of the HiRise is a miniature hinge inside its base. I’m not sure it’s feasible but the hinge would let the support pad collapse into a flat position.

That would mark a great feature for frequent travelers as your HiRise would be ready to go in literally just a few seconds, as opposed to having to unscrew the stand’s support bar from the base and remember to bring along the Allen wrench in the first place.

I asked the team if there are plans to implement a hinge inside the HiRise, but got a “Unfortunately, we do not discuss any potential product developments” response.

I should point out securing the support bar to the base with the included screw is optional. However, frequent travelers should also know that without the screw in place the support bar can wobble backwards a bit.

As things stand, people who travel a lot should buy a separate charging puck for travel to avoid unscrewing the HiRise’s support bar every time they hit the road. As for the lack of a gold edition, I was told that “There will not be a gold color option, because it wouldn’t necessarily match the finish”.

“The gold watches look great on the black HiRise,” Twelve South tells me.

Other then the aforementioned first-world problems, I had no major complaints about Twelve South’s HiRise for Apple Watch.

Final thoughts

Bringing its expertise in making stands to the Apple Watch, Twelve South has managed to create a stand I feel comfortable using on a daily basis to support my watch while it’s juicing.

I know there are stands out there which cost less. I’m also aware that some of them offer additional bells and whistles. But now that you have parted with your hard earned cash to buy that pricey smartwatch of yours, you shouldn’t skimp on getting a functional charging dock that’ll last.

After using my HiRise for just a few days, I revered in disgust at the very though of going back to laying the watch on its side every time it needed charging.

It just felt awkward and not very user-friendly to charge my watch the old way, not to mention the incredibly irritating sight of the charging disk just laying there on my nightstand like it doesn’t have anything better to do.

Should you buy it?

If you’re a fan of Twelve South’s design philosophy and own an Apple Watch, then I’d say yes, go ahead and treat yourself to this nicely designed accessory. It’s durable, sturdy and versatile and I don’t think you’ll regret getting yourself one of these.

Twelve South’s accessories are generally lauded for being very durable: I know that because I’ve used quite a few of them over the past few years. In that regard, I would say that the HiRise is one of the best accessories out there to trick out your fancy new Apple Watch.

It docks and charges your Apple Watch at the same time while ensuring that it and the watch it docks are both well protected from metal-to-metal scratches. That it hides the cable from plain sight is a nice cherry of functionality on top.

I also think it’s priced reasonably.

HiRise for Apple Watch at a glance

Pros

Unassuming—And that’s a good thing: your watch is showy, but its stand doesn’t need to be.

Secure—It’ll keep even scratch-prone stainless steel in pristine condition thanks to soft leather and silicone accents at the right places.

Convenient—Docks and charges your watch while letting you use it safely and routing the charging cable through the back.

Versatile—Compatible with all Apple Watch models, sizes and bands.

Cons

Nightstand mode incompatible—HiRise is only portrait and watchOS 2’s Nighstand mode was designed for landscape.

Non-collapsable—Would be nice if the support pad could collapse into a compact position, but definitely not a biggie unless you travel a lot (in which case you should get a separate charging disk for travel).

The HiRise for Apple Watch is available in silver and black can be yours in exchange for $49.99 from the Twelve South webstore, chúng tôi and select retailers.

How To Return Pixel Depth Of The Screen In Javascript?

In this tutorial, we will discuss how we can return the pixel depth of the screen in JavaScript. There is a property in JavaScript name pixel depth with the help of this property we can quickly return the pixel depth of the screen’s color. This pixel depth property returns the screen’s color depth in bits per pixel, and this property is read-only means (A property’s value can be accessed, but it cannot be given a value. or we could state that it cannot be assigned to or overwritten).

Basically, we are returning how many bits are used to store a screen pixel. The maximum amount, of colors that can be displayed, is known as color depth and is sometimes referred to as “pixel depth” and “bit depth“. Modern graphics cards enable True Color (24-bit color), which is needed for photorealistic images and videos.

Syntax

Let’s see the syntax of returning the pixel depth of the screen’s color using JavaScript −

let depth; depth = screen.pixelDepth;

Here we define the ‘let’ variable (or we can also use ‘var’ in the place of let) then we give the screen’s color depth to the let variable using the screen.pixelDepth property of JavaScript.

Note − Prior to Internet Explorer 9, the pixel depth attribute was not supported. The result returned by pixelDepth and colorDepth is the same, though. Use colorDepth (screen.colourDepth) property as an alternative since it is supported by all browsers.

Algorithm

We have seen the syntax above for returning the pixel depth of the screen’s color, now we are going to see the complete approach step by step −

First, we will create the body of the Html code.

In the body we will create a button using the ‘button’ tag.

In the script, we will create a variable to store the value got from the ‘screen.pixelDepth’ method.

Using the ‘document.write’ method we print the screen’s color pixel depth.

Example 1

We have seen the steps to get the pixel depth of the screen, now let’s implement these steps into the code to get more understanding of it −

function

display

(

)

{

let

cur

=

screen

.

pixelDepth

;

document

.

write

(

“Pixel Depth of the screen is: “

+

cur

)

;

}

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We have defined the ‘display’ function in the script tag and it contains the variable ‘cur’ which will contain the return value from the method ‘screen.pixelDepth’ and finally it will print in the document.

Note − Related to the pixel method to get the depth of the screen we have two more methods related to the screen, they are ‘screen.width’ and ‘screen.height’. As the method’s syntax suggests, these functions are used to get the width and height of the screen respectively.

Example 2

Let’s see the code to use these functions and get all the details of the screen −

function

display

(

)

{

let

height

=

screen

.

height

;

let

width

=

screen

.

width

;

let

pixel

=

screen

.

pixelDepth

;

document

.

write

(

“Dimentions of the screen are: “

)

;

}

We have defined the ‘display’ function in the script tag and it contains the variable ‘height’, ‘width’, and ‘ which will contain the return value from the methods ‘screen.height’ , ‘screen.width’, and ‘screen.pixelDepth’ and finally it will print these in the document.

Conclusion

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