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Introduction to SQL Datediff()

In SQL server suppose we have dates in our data and we want to know the difference between those dates then we can use the DATEDIFF function to know the difference between those dates in days, months, or years. So this function returns an integer as output and to understand more about this function lets know it’s syntax first.

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Syntax of Datediff() in SQL DATEDIFF (interval, startdate, enddate)

1. Interval – This is also called datepart and it is provided as a string to this function. This argument can be anything that represents a time interval like a month, week, day, year. We can also specify the quarter of the year.

year, yyyy, yy = Year SELECT DATEDIFF(year, '2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000'); quarter, qq, q = Quarter SELECT DATEDIFF(quarter,'2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000'); month, mm, m = month SELECT DATEDIFF(month, '2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000'); dayofyear = Day of the year SELECT DATEDIFF(dayofyear,'2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000'); day, dy, y = Da SELECT DATEDIFF(day,'2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000'); week, ww, wk = Week SELECT DATEDIFF(week,'2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000'); hour, hh = hour SELECT DATEDIFF(hour,'2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000'); minute, mi, n = Minute SELECT DATEDIFF(minute,'2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000'); second, ss, s = Second SELECT DATEDIFF(second,'2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000'); millisecond, ms = Millisecond SELECT DATEDIFF(millisecond,'2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000'); microsecond, mcs = Microsecond SELECT DATEDIFF(microsecond,'2010-12-31 23:59:59.9999999', '2011-01-01 00:00:00.0000000');

2. startdate, enddate – These are the actual dates to get the difference between. This is a mandatory parameter.

This function works in the SQL server starting from the 2008 version, Azure SQL Data Warehouse, Azure SQL Database, Parallel Data Warehouse.

Return Value

The return value is an int and is expressed by the datepart or the interval boundary which is the difference between the start and end date.

If the range of the return value for int is out of[-2,147,483,648 to +2,147,483,647], DATEDIFF function returns an error. The max difference between the start and end date is 24 days, 20 hours, 31 minutes, and 23.647 seconds for the millisecond. The max difference is 68 years, 19 days, 3 hours, 14 minutes, and 7 seconds for the second.

If the start and end date have a date with different data type then DATEDIFF will set 0 the missing parts of the other date which has lower precision

The above queries have the same start and end values. These are adjacent dates and the difference between them is a hundred nanoseconds (.0000001 second). The start and end dates cross one calendar and the result of each query is 1.

Examples

Here are the examples mention below

Example #1 – Calculating Age select ID,emp_name,emp_dateOfBirth from Employee

We have the above table Employee which consists of the date of birth and from this, we will calculate the age in terms of a year, month, and days in 2 steps

Step 1: Creating a function

CREATE FUNCTION fnEmpComputeAge(@EmpDOB DATETIME) RETURNS NVARCHAR(50) AS BEGIN DECLARE @AgeTempdate DATETIME, @AgeYears INT, @AgeMonths INT, @AgeDays INT SELECT @AgeTempdate= @EmpDOB SELECT @AgeTempdate=DATEADD(YEAR, @AgeYears, @AgeTempdate) SELECT @AgeTempdate=DATEADD(MONTH, @AgeMonths, @AgeTempdate) SELECT @AgeDays=DATEDIFF(DAY, @AgeTempdate,GETDATE()) DECLARE @EmpAge NVARCHAR(50) SET @EmpAge=Cast(@AgeYears AS NVARCHAR(4))+' AgeYears '+Cast(@AgeMonths AS NVARCHAR(2))+' AgeMonths '+Cast(@AgeDays AS NVARCHAR(2))+' AgeDays Old' RETURN @EmpAge End

In the above example, we have created a SQL Function to calculate the age of the employee from the DOB so the function takes @EmpDOBas a parameter and returns NVARCHAR(50). We will see this in action when we run this function. In step, we have created this function.

Then we add the calculated years in the @AgeTempdate using the DATEADD function.

Similarly, we calculated the month and added in @AgeTempdate, and then it is used to calculate days. Next, we declared @EmpAge and set it to the concatenation of the final output. Since the calculation result is in int we used Cast function to convert it into nvarchar.

Step 2: Using the function in the query

select ID,emp_name,emp_dateOfBirth,dbo.fnEmpComputeAge(emp_dateOfBirth) as EmpAge from Employee

The result is as follows:

As we can see we have used dbo.fnEmpComputeAge function and passed emp_dateOfBirth to calculate EmpAge and the result is as above.

Example #2 – Using scalar functions and subqueries for start and end date SELECT DATEDIFF(day, (SELECT MIN([ShipDate])FROM Sales.SalesOrderHeader), (SELECT MAX([ShipDate])FROM Sales.SalesOrderHeader)) as ShippingDateDiff;

The result is as follows:

In this example, we have calculated the shipping date difference using scalar functions and scalar subqueries for min and max.

Example #3 – Using ranking functions for the start date argument SELECT FirstName as first_name,LastName as last_name, DATEDIFF(day,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY DepartmentName),SYSDATETIME()) AS row_number FROM dbo.DimEmployee;

The result is as follows:

In this function, we have used ROW_NUMBER() ranking function as the start date argument.

Example #4 – Using an aggregate window function for the start date argument SELECT FirstName as first_name,LastName as last_name,DepartmentName as department_name, DATEDIFF(year,MAX(HireDate) OVER (PARTITION BY DepartmentName),SYSDATETIME()) AS HireInterval FROM dbo.DimEmployee

Conclusion

Hopefully, now you know what DATEDIFF() is in the SQL server and how it is used to calculate results the difference between date according to datepart.

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Learn The Examples Of Truncate Table Statement

Introduction to SQL TRUNCATE()

TRUNCATE in standard query language (SQL) is a data definition language (DDL) statement used to delete complete data from a database table without deleting it. It frees up space or empties space in the table. However, we should note that TRUNCATE TABLE statements might need to be roll backable in many SQL databases. Also, being a DDL statement, the TRUNCATE table statement does not require a commit at each step; it automatically fires a commit at the end of the execution of the statement. Hence, we should be careful while using it.

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Syntax and Parameters

The basic syntax for using a SQL TRUNCATE TABLE statement is as follows :

TRUNCATE TABLE table_name;

Table_name: It is the name of the table whose records or rows you want to delete permanently.

How does the TRUNCATE TABLE statement work in SQL?

TRUNCATE TABLE statement in SQL works by zeroing out a file in the database, i.e., after running a TRUNCATE statement on an existing table, the table becomes empty and hence does not hold any row records. It resets the table to zero entries.

However, its structure, columns, indexes, constraints, relationships, views, etc., are preserved after truncating the table. The entire operation is like erasing data from the table but keeping the table intact.

TRUNCATE in Data Definition Language (DDL) is equivalent to DELETE in Data Manipulation Language (DML). The only difference is that the latter can be rolled back, but the first cannot. However, TRUNCATE is faster than DELETE because it usually bypasses the transaction system. It is not logged (it can vary across SQL databases) and does not follow predicates and hence seems to be faster than the DELETE operation. DELETE is a safer and slower operation.

Examples of SQL TRUNCATE()

Here are a few examples to explain the TRUNCATE TABLE statement in great detail.

Example #1

Simple SQL query to illustrate the function of the TRUNCATE TABLE statement.

To understand the SQL TRUNCATE TABLE, let us consider a “customers” table. The data in the table looks like this.

Command:

SELECT * FROM public.customers

Output:

Next, let us run the TRUNCATE TABLE statement on the customer’s table to remove all its records. We can do so using the following SQL query.

Command:

TRUNCATE TABLE customers;

Output:

We can see in the figure below that the TRUNCATE TABLE statement has removed all the records in the customer’s table. However, all the columns, relationships, indexes, and table structures have been kept safe.

Command:

SELECT * FROM customers;

Output:

Example #2

For this, let us consider two tables, “customer_details” and “students”. The table structure and the data in them look something like this. Records in the “Customer_details” table are as follows:

Command:

SELECT * FROM public.customers_details

Output:

Records in the “Students” table are as follows:

SELECT * FROM public.students

Output:

Next, we will run the TRUNCATE TABLE on the customer_details table and DROP TABLE on the student’s table, and then we will check the difference.

Command:

TRUNCATE TABLE customer_details;

Output:

Command:

Output:

We can observe from the images above that the DROP TABLE statement is faster than the TRUNCATE TABLE statement in SQL.

Now let us check what happened to the two tables after truncating and dropping, respectively.

Command:

SELECT * FROM customer_details;

Output:

Command:

SELECT * FROM students;

Output:

From the above two images, we can observe that in the TRUNCATE statement, the table structure is preserved; only the data/records in the table have been removed. Whereas in the case of the DROP TABLE statement, the entire table has been removed from the database.

Conclusion

TRUNCATE TABLE in SQL is a Data Definition Language (DDL) statement that empties an existing table by removing all the records while preserving table columns, privileges, indexes, views, constraints, relationships, etc. It is equivalent to but faster than the DELETE statement in SQL. However, unlike DELETE, it cannot be rolled back.

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Learn The Different Examples Of Plsql Pivot

Introduction to PLSQL pivot

PL/SQL provides the different types of functionality to the user; the pivot is the one type of functionality that is provided by the PL/SQL. Basically, we call it a pivot clause. By using pivot clauses, we cross table query as per requirement; in another way, we can combine, or we can aggregate our result from rows into the columns as per our requirement. Basically, the pivot clause introduced in Oracle 11g and the pivot returns more than one column after the execution. By using pivot clauses, we can combine the difference into a single result and generate the required output.

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Syntax select * from (select colm name 1, colm name name N from specified table where conditional expression) PIVOT

Explanation

First, we use the select clause to retrieve the records from the specified table. Inside the select, we write the subquery with a column name, and here we specify where clause with conditional expression.

Specified aggregate function name: it is used to specify the aggregate function name that we can write any function name such as SUM, MIN, MAX, etc.

IN (specified expression 1, specified expression 2,…..specified expression N): It is used to hold the list of column name 2 that values to pivot into the cross table.

Specified subquery: Basically, it is used instead of list values, and the output of the subquery would be utilized to calculate the values for column 2 in the cross-tabulation query output, which would then be translated to headings in this syntax.

How does pivot work in PL/SQL?

Now let’s see how pivot clauses work in PL/SQL as follows.

Let’s see the different ways to implement the pivot clause as follows.

Specify the Group Columns:

Any columns not stated in the FOR clause are utilized as a part of the Oracle PIVOT GROUP BY when employing the PIVOT keyword. The only column in the previous example was the location column, which was fine.

We can also use the Where clause with pivot clause:

The results of our searches above provide a pivoted summary of all data. A few fields are used to aggregate all of the entries, and the SUM of the selling amount is displayed.

What if you want to limit it to just a few rows?

Like a regular SELECT query, you may use a WHERE clause. Then we will get the error due to incorrect syntax, so we need to write the correct syntax that means the PIVOT clause must appear after the WHERE clause; this is the case.

Now let’s see how we can use Aliasing in the pivot column:

The column headings will be shown as the table’s column name in the queries we’ve looked at so far. What if you want to call them something else? A column alias can be specified using the PIVOT keyword. Both the pivot clause and the pivot in a clause can be used for this.

Now let’s see how we can perform the multiple aggregations in pivot:

We can make the group of multiple columns:

This is another way to implement the multiple columns into the pivot statement to group by multiple columns as per our requirement.

We can implement pivot with XML as follows:

You may display your findings in an XML format using the PIVOT keyword. It’s as simple as following the PIVOT keyword with the XML keyword.

Examples of PLSQL pivot

Now let’s see the different examples of pivot clauses in PL/SQL for better understanding as follows.

First, we need to create the table by using the following create table statement as follows.

create table stud(roll_no integer not null, name varchar2(50), dept_id integer not null, primary key(roll_no));

Explanation

By using create table statement, we created a new table name as a stud with different attributes such as roll_no, name, and dept_id with different data types, and in this example, the primary key is roll_no. The final output of the above statement we illustrated by using the following screenshot as follows.

insert into stud(roll_no, name, dept_id) values(1,'Jenny',10); insert into stud(roll_no, name, dept_id) values(2,'Jenny',10); insert into stud(roll_no, name, dept_id) values(3,'Jenny',20); insert into stud(roll_no, name, dept_id) values(5,'Sameer',20); insert into stud(roll_no, name, dept_id) values(6,'Sameer',10); insert into stud(roll_no, name, dept_id) values(7,'Sameer',20);

Explanation

In the stud table, we inserted a total of 6 records by using the above statement. The final output of the above statement we illustrated by using the following screenshot as follows.

If records are not in order, then we can use order by clause to make the records in order. In this example, all records we order by roll_no, as shown in the above screenshot.

Now implement the pivot clause that means write the cross table subquery as follows.

select * from (select name, dept_id from stud) pivot (count(dept_id) for dept_id IN (10, 20, 30)) order by name;

Explanation

In the above example, we write the two different queries that we call subquery and merge by using the pivot clause. Now let’s see how it works. In the above example, we first decide which field we want to add in the pivot clause; here, we add name and dept_no. After that, we need to specify the column in any order that we want. The next part of the query, it contains the aggregate function and pivot value that we want, as shown in the above statement. The final output of the above statement we illustrated by using the following screenshot as follows.

Conclusion – PLSQL pivot

We hope from this article you learn PL/SQL pivot. From the above article, we have learned the basic syntax of the pivot, and we also see different examples of the pivot. From this article, we learned how and when we use PL/SQL pivot.

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A Quick Glance Of Sql All With Query Examples

Introduction to SQL ALL

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Syntax and Parameters

The basic syntax for using ALL operator with SELECT statement is as follows :

SELECT ALL column_name FROM table_name WHERE condition(s);

The basic syntax for using ALL operator in WHERE clause is as follows :

SELECT column_name1, column_name2 FROM table_name WHERE column_name comparison_operator ALL (SELECT column_name FROM table_name WHERE condition_expression ); Parameters

The parameters used in the above-mentioned syntaxes is as follows :

table_name: Name of the database table from which the said columns will be fetched.

column_name: column which has to be used as a part of WHERE condition for comparison.

(SELECT column_name FROM table_name WHERE condition_expression ): The values obtained from the result set of this subquery will be compared with the column_name.

The syntax for using ALL operator with a HAVING clause is similar to the WHERE clause. The only difference is HAVING is generally used with GROUP BY clauses.

Examples of SQL ALL

In order to illustrate the functionality of ALL operator in SQL, what could be better than trying a few examples on a dummy table. Ergo, let us create two database tables called “employee” and “departments” respectively.

We can use the following CREATE table statements to create these tables.

CREATE TABLE employee ( employee_id integer, employee_name character varying(255), department_id character varying(255), salary numeric, highest_qualification character varying(255) )

CREATE TABLE departments ( department_id character varying(255), department_name character varying(255), location character varying(255), manager_id integer )

We have successfully created both the tables, namely “employee” and “departments”. Now with the help of the given INSERT queries given below, let us insert a few records in both the tables to work with.

(i) INSERT statement for inserting records in the employee table.

INSERT INTO public.employee( employee_id, employee_name, department_id, salary, highest_qualification) VALUES (101,'Roy Bernard','D01',5000,'B.Sc'), (102,'Gina Messenger','D01',6200,'M.Sc'), (105,'Jim Perkins','D03',5000,'B.A'), (106,'Erica Silverman','D03',7000,'MBA'), (107,'Priyanka M','D01',5000,'B.Tech');

(ii) INSERT statement for inserting records in departments table.

INSERT INTO public.departments( department_id, department_name, location, manager_id) VALUES ('D01','Research','Singapore',102), ('D02','Human Resource','Santa Monica',104), ('D003','Sales','New York',106);

Now we are all set to try a few examples based on these tables.

Example #1 – ALL operator with SELECT statement

Show the list of all the employees depicting their employee_id and names.

Code:

SELECT ALL employee_id, employee_name FROM employee WHERE department_id = 'D003';

Output:

Example #2 – ALL operator with WHERE clause

Find the employee_ids and salaries of employees who earn less than or equal to all the employees in the ‘D003’ department.

SELECT employee_id, salary FROM employee WHERE salary <= ALL(SELECT salary FROM employee WHERE department_id = 'D003');

Output:

Example #3

Find the employee_id, salary, and highest qualification of employees who earn equal to all the managers in the company’s New York office.

SELECT employee_id, salary, highest_qualification FROM employee WHERE employee_id = ALL(SELECT manager_id FROM departments WHERE location = 'New York');

Output:

Example #4 – ALL operator with HAVING clause

Prepare a summary table consisting of total employees and average salaries grouped together by highest qualification, provided that salaries of these employees is more than the average salary of all the departments.

Code:

SELECT highest_qualification, count(employee_id) as "Total_employees", ROUND(AVG(salary),2) as "Average_salary" FROM employee GROUP BY highest_qualification FROM departments as d JOIN employee as e ON d.department_id = e.department_id );

Output:

Example #5 – ALL operator with the UPDATE statement

Suppose the company has decided to raise the salaries of employees who have been earning a minimum salary until now to $5100. Write an update query to perform this task.

Code:

UPDATE employee SET salary = 5100 WHERE salary <= ALL(SELECT MIN(salary) FROM employee );

Output:

The query returned successfully. Let us check using the following SELECT query if the desired changes have been made.

SELECT * FROM employee;

Output:

It can be observed from the image that the salaries of employees who have been earning $5000 have been updated to $5100.

ALL operator with the DELETE statement

DELETE FROM employee WHERE employee_id = ALL( SELECT manager_id FROM departments WHERE department_id = 'D01');

Output:

Use the following SELECT query to check if the desired rows have been deleted.

SELECT * FROM employee;

Output:

The query returned successfully and has deleted the details of department D01’s manager.

Conclusion

ALL is a comparison operator that returns TRUE if all the values in the result set obtained from a subquery meet the specified condition. The operator can be used along with a SELECT statement, WHERE, and HAVING clause.

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Guide To Uses Of Pl/Sql Exit With Examples

Introduction to PL/SQL exit

Pl/SQL exit statement is used for terminating the execution, especially while working with loops and nested loops. In case, if you have a requirement where you need to halt or stop the execution of loop then you can specify the same y making the use of EXIT statement in PL/ SQL program in the LOOP body. There is one more way in which we can use EXIT statement which is along with WHEN statement. The EXIT WHEN statement allows you to specify the condition when you have to exit from that block of code. In this article, we will have a look at the syntax of EXIT and EXIT WHEN, usage of both of them in particular scenarios, and the implementation of these statements along with the help of certain examples.

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Use of EXIT

When working with loops, at the time of recursive execution of loop body, if a certain condition evaluates to true and the flow encounters the EXIT statement then the control is transferred to the statement that is present just below the place where the loop is ending.

When we have nested loops where there is a presence of a loop inside the loop then the use of EXIT statement will make the termination of execution of the innermost loop and the flow of control will be transferred to the end of the block of the innermost loop. The execution will begin from the line after the last line of the innermost loop.

Syntax:

The syntax of the EXIT statement is as shown below in Pl/ SQL –

EXIT;

The use of the above syntax of EXIT is mostly done along with the conditional statements. If the evaluation of the condition inside this statement becomes true then or when it is false in case of ELSE statement, we can make the use of EXIT function inside IF body or ELSE body according to our necessity and requirement.

Example 1

Let us study how we can implement the simple EXIT statement along with the use of conditional statements in PL/ SQL program along with the help of an example –

DECLARE numberCounter number(2) := 5; BEGIN WHILE numberCounter < 15 LOOP numberCounter := numberCounter + 1; EXIT; END IF; END LOOP; END;

The output of the above PL/ SQL program is as shown below –

In the above example when the value of the number counter becomes more than 10 which is 11 then the condition specified inside the while loop in the if the statement becomes true and execution encounters the EXIT statement which results in the flow of execution being transferred to the statement outside the WHILE loop which stops printing the numbers after 10 in the output.

When the condition mentioned after WHEN statement evaluates to false then the EXIT statement does not terminate the execution and behaves like a NULL statement in that scenario. When the condition becomes true the execution of the loop terminates and the control is transferred to the statement after the END LOOP statement.

Syntax:

The syntax of EXIT WHEN statement in PL/ SQL programming is as shown below:

EXIT WHEN condition to be evaluated

The condition to be evaluated should result in a Boolean value which is either true or false. The use of EXIT THEN statement is helpful as it helps in writing the code for exiting even without using the conditional statements like IF else or IF THEN in PL/ SQL.

Considerations of EXIT WHEN statement –

The EXIT WHEN statement can be used in PL/ SQL considering two main aspects which are listed below –

The value of the condition which is evaluated should be changed by the statements which are present inside the LOOP or else it will be an infinite loop if the condition always evaluates false.

Example

In order to get clarity in implementation of EXIT WHEN statement in PL/ SQL let us consider one example. Let us try to get the same output as that of the above program but instead of using just EXIT and the conditional IF statement, we will now make the use of EXIT WHEN statement as shown below –

DECLARE count_variable number(2) := 5; BEGIN WHILE count_variable < 15 LOOP count_variable := count_variable + 1; END LOOP; END;

The output of the above code is as shown below which is the same as that of the first example –

The condition mentioned after the WHEN statement is evaluated for each and every time the WHILE LOOP is traversed. Till the counter variable has a value less than 11 it evaluates false and so the EXIT WHEN statement is considered as the NULL statement. As soon as the value of the counter variable becomes 11 which is greater than 10 the condition becomes true and then the EXIT statement terminates the execution of the while loop and the flow of control is transferred to the statement placed just below the END LOOP statement.

Conclusion – PL/SQL exit

The EXIT and EXIT WHEN statement in PL/ SQL helps to specify the condition in which we can help the termination of the loop on a conditional basis.

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Learn Working Of Json In Swift With Examples

Introduction to Swift JSON

Swift JSON is used for communication of the IOS web application with the server by returning a series of formatted data or information. This formatted data organized in a proper hierarchical manner is called Swift JSON. Foundation framework that includes a class called JSONSerialization is exclusively used for converting any JSON involved within the web application into Swift data types like array, number, bool, String, and Dictionary. It is very difficult to predict the actual structure or the order in which values of JSON-based web applications will receive as part of returned data.

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There is no proper syntax for any Swift JSON it can be any resource file containing the data in an ordered manner as represented below but then indentation does matter while validating any JSON data as improper JSON input might vary and can behave differently while parsing and traversing as well.

{ "title": "some_data", "url": "any_url_can_be_included", "category": "Category_for_swift_language", "views": 25648 } How JSON works in Swift?

JSON parsing or manipulation with JSON in any programming language is a common functionality when any web application tries to communicate with the other server.

Any web application dealing with JSON data tries to decode the JSON data in an ordered manner. Swift JSON parsing is very important for any IOS developer as they will most often get acquainted with these kinds of data.

Decoding modules in swift are quite flexible and are very easy to understand without any indulgence of external API.

There are times when swift JSON containing JSONSerialization class method returns a value of any type and throws error in case the data cannot get parsed easily then a proper validation with error elicitation will be given to the user for identification of the actual exception.

Although the JSON data will get validated still there will be times when JSON may contain a single value, a response from a web application can encode an object or array as any top-level object for manipulation.

All the data types related to swift get used as per requirement and any optional value can be considered for it.

There is quite a need to create Model objects from the Model-view-controller design pattern that are often used to convert json data to objects which are specific to the application’s domain in a model view.

If the applications are related to one or more web services do not return a single, or consistent model for the representation of a model object, considering implementation of several initializers to handle all the possible representations.

JSON initializer helps a lot when it comes to extracting and getting the detailed implementation with errors and exceptions. Error Handling with error protocols helps in deserialization with the fail for protocol.

Many times, it happens that the application returns multiple endpoints for any resource that returns a single JSON response following any particular protocol.

A search endpoint may return zero or more endpoints then in that case the requested query may contain more or other metadata while presenting for the endpoint.

JSON parser plays a pivotal role in parsing as it helps in making the entire JSON data organized in a properly visualized format which gives an impression that the data can be organized in a proper manner.

Swift is the programming language that allows programmers to use and make the data ordered and visualized in a very easy and effective manner by giving an idea of proper idealization and organization for operations and manipulations.

Examples of Swift JSON

Here are the following examples mentioned below.

Example #1

This program demonstrates the JSON data where the input feed is represented as follows and the output feed after execution of the JSON parsing comes out to be shown as output. But it makes the Sample usage feed with the codeable mapping.

Code:

{ "title": "Usage of the optional Swift language.", "version": "4.0", "category": "Swift_version", "views": 25642 }

Output:

Example #2

This program demonstrates the JSON data where the input feed is represented with the same input as example 1 but with the mere difference of the fact that the JSON decoder will make use of the Object mapper for conversion of JSON String to model. This is shown in the output as shown:

Code:

{ "title": "Usage of the optional Swift language.", "version": "4.0", "category": "Swift_version", "views": 25642 }

Output:

Example #3

This program demonstrates the JSON data where the input feed is represented with the same input as example 1 but with the more difference of the fact that the JSON decoder will make use of the dictionary mapper for conversion of JSON String to model. This is shown in the output as shown:

{ "title": "Usage of the optional Swift language.", "version": "4.0", "category": "Swift_version", "views": 25642 }

Output:

Example #4

This program demonstrates the custom mapping for each defined key with the mapping of a blog and key and value pairs with the JSON and making the key encoding as the main conversion of the JSON to a blog.

Code:

{ "title": "Sat_Sun_Week:end_Comboff", "version": "swift_version_4.0", "visitors_way": 258965, "posts_for_members": 62542 }

Output:

Example #5

This program demonstrates the custom mapping for each defined key with the mapping of a blog and key and value pairs with the JSON and making the Object mapper in use for representation as shown in the output.

{ "title": "Sat_Sun_Week:end_Comboff", "version": "swift_version_4.0", "visitors_way": 258965, "posts_for_members": 62542 }

Output:

Example #6

This program demonstrates the custom mapping for each defined key with the mapping of a blog, key and value pairs with the JSON and making the Dictionary mapper in use for representation as shown in the output.

Code:

{ "title": "Sat_Sun_Week:end_Comboff", "version": "swift_version_4.0", "visitors_way": 258965, "posts_for_members": 62542 }

Output:

Conclusion

Swift JSON is the proper way of validating and making the entire data set and information organized in a visualized manner for the programmers. The successful communication between any web application and server helps a lot to analyze the entire application for product analysis and division of information uniformly among all applications efficiently.

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This is a guide to Swift JSON. Here we discuss the introduction, syntax, and working of Swift JSON along with examples and code implementation. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

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