Trending March 2024 # How To Sort By Date In Microsoft Excel # Suggested April 2024 # Top 12 Popular

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Before You Start Sorting Dates

The cell that contains your date is in the Date or General format. You can check the cell format from the Home tab. If the cell is not in the date format, you can select the fly-out menu in the Number section and choose Date or General. 

How to Sort Dates in Excel?

You can use the Sort & Filter tool to sort cells from ascending to descending order and vice-versa. However, you do not have the flexibility to sort dates by days, weeks, and months through this filter. You will have to use the library functions Excel offers to sort dates in this manner.

Use Sort and Filter Tool

The sort and filter tool is a quick way to sort dates from highest to lowest value. This tool sorts the dates according to the year. You will have to choose different options depending on whether you want to sort your dates according to ascending or descending order.

On your workbook, select the cell range with the dates.

Head to the Data tab.

Under Order, select the fly-out menu.

To sort dates in ascending order, choose Newest to Oldest.

Use Excel Functions

If you wish to sort dates out by days, weeks, and months, you will first have to extract these data using the library functions. Then, you can use the Sort & Filter tool to sort your data from ascending to descending order or vice-versa. The following methods use dates in the mm/dd/yyyy format.

Sort Dates by Days

You might find sorting dates by days useful while working with deadlines. This way, you can view your employees’ approaching deadlines. Before entering the formula, ensure you have correctly entered your dates. 

On your worksheet, create a next column named “days”. On the first empty cell on the column, enter the formula in the following format:

=DAY(cell)

Sorting Dates by Weeks

If you are dealing with longer deadlines, you can sort the dates by week. Create a new column named “weeks” and enter the formula in the following format on the first cell of the columns:

=WEEKDAY(cell)

Sorting Dates by Months

You would want to sort your dates by month to keep track of birthdays, anniversaries, or annual events. Create a new column named “Months” on the worksheet with the dates you want to sort dates by month. On the first cell in the Months column, enter the formula in this format:

=MONTH(cell)

How to Create a Macro to Automatically Sort Date in Excel?

Macros are an amazing way to automate tasks in Excel. If you frequently need to sort dates out in Excel, you can record a Macro and run it the next time you want to get the job done. This will save you a lot of time compared to repeating these methods manually.

You can start recording a Macro from the Developer tab. After you hit record, you can carry on to continue the above-mentioned methods. Remember that all your actions are recorded, so only perform actions you wish to automate. Excel will record your keystrokes and save them as a Macro in the Visual Basics code.

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How To Use The Count Functions In Microsoft Excel

How to Use the COUNT Function

The COUNT function in Excel is one of the most basic of the five functions. Use it to count the number of cells containing values, which is handy for seeing the number of sales, reviews, or numeric grades in your sheet. Note that text is not counted as a value.

The syntax for the formula is COUNT(value1, value2,…), where only the first argument is required. You can enter the range of cells and add up to 255 additional items or cell ranges using the remaining arguments.

For this first example, we’re using the COUNT function via the following formula to total the number of cells containing values in our range B2 through B11:

=

COUNT

(

B2

:

B11

)

To show the difference if you have text in a cell rather than a number, you can see our next result is 9 instead of 10, as cell B8 contains the word “six.”

If you want to count the total numbers in a cell range, but not place the formula in your sheet, use the Status Bar at the bottom of the Excel window.

How to Use the COUNTA Function

The syntax is similar to the COUNT function, COUNTA(value1, value2,…), where only the first argument is required, and you can include up to 255 additional arguments. Keep in mind that the function counts cells that contain errors, formulas, and formula results, as these cells are not blank.

In this example, we’re using the following formula to count the number of cells containing values in our range B2 through C11:

=

COUNTA

(

B2

:

C11

)

Our result is 16, as that’s the number of cells in our range that contain values.

Note: if you need to remove empty cells or want to surface data that meets specific criteria, try using filters in Excel.

How to Use the COUNTBLANK Function

The syntax is COUNTBLANK(range), where you have just one argument for the cell range.

Using the following formula, we’re counting the number of blank cells in the range B2 through C11:

=

COUNTBLANK

(

B2

:

C11

)

Our result is 4 empty cells.

Tip: want to reorganize your data so that columns become rows and vice versa? Transpose your data in Excel to make that happen.

How to Use the COUNTIF Function

The syntax is COUNTIF(value, criteria), where both arguments are required. Use the “value” argument for the cell range and the “criteria” argument for the data you want to locate. You’ll need to place the condition you use for the second argument within quotation marks if it’s text or a comparison operator.

In this first example, we’re counting the number of cells in the range B2 through B11 that contain the number 10 with this formula:

=

COUNTIF

(

B2

:

B11,

10

)

The result is 3 cells that contain the value of 10.

For an example using text, we’re counting the number of cells in the range A2 through A11 that start with “San.” Use the formula:

=

COUNTIF

(

A2

:

A11,

"San*"

)

“San*” was added in quotation marks using an asterisk (*) as a wildcard so that any letters after “San” are counted. We received a result of 2.

For an example that uses a comparison operator, we’re counting the number of cells in the range C2 through C11 that are less than or equal to 5,000 with this formula:

=

COUNTIF

(

C2

:

C11,

"<=5000"

)

We placed our comparison operator “<=5000” within quotes and received a count of 7.

How to Use the COUNTIFS Function

If you like the idea of entering criteria for the cells you want to count but would like to narrow it down even further or total values in more cells, use the COUNTIFS function. You can count cells that contain multiple conditions instead of just one when using the COUNTIF function.

The syntax is COUNTIFS(range1, criteria1, range2, criteria2,…), where the first two arguments are required for the cell range and condition. Use the additional arguments for the second set of cells and/or conditions.

For this example, we’re counting the number of records containing a 10 in the range B2 through B11 and a value of 1,000 in the range C2 though C11 using this formula:

=

COUNTIFS

(

B2

:

B11,

10

,C2

:

C11,

1000

)

Our result is 2 records that have both 10 and 1,000 in those cell ranges.

Using a text example, we’re counting the number of records that start with the letter “S” in the range A2 through A11 and have a value greater than 9 in the range B2 through B11 with this formula:

In another example, we’re using the same cell range for multiple criteria. We’re counting the number of records that have a value less than 10,000 and greater than 2,000 in the range C2 through C11 with this formula:

Tip: if you also use Google’s apps, check out several helpful functions for Google Sheets, too.

Frequently Asked Questions How do I auto count cells in Excel?

If you need to add numbers to cells in a column or row, use Excel’s auto-fill feature. To start counting at one, enter 1 in the first cell and 2 in the second cell. Then, select both cells and drag the fill handle (square in the bottom-right corner) down a column or across a row to fill the remaining cells.

To use a different numbering scheme, for example, 10, 20, 30, and so on, enter the first two numbers you want to use in the first two cells, then use the fill handle. Excel should recognize your numbering pattern and comply.

How do I sum values in Excel?

You can use the SUM function to add values in cells together. This is handy for totaling your monthly bills, sales, or inventory.

The Status Bar in Excel shows information about your sheet, errors you may encounter, and quick calculations, like those mentioned above. This displays at the bottom of the window in Excel, as well as other Microsoft applications, like Word and PowerPoint.

Image credit: Pixabay. All screenshots by Sandy Writtenhouse.

Sandy Writtenhouse

With her BS in Information Technology, Sandy worked for many years in the IT industry as a Project Manager, Department Manager, and PMO Lead. She wanted to help others learn how technology can enrich business and personal lives and has shared her suggestions and how-tos across thousands of articles.

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How To Sort A List In Python

Sorting is an essential task in programming, and Python provides several ways to sort a list. A list is a mutable sequence data type that stores a collection of items, such as integers, strings, or objects. Sorting a list means arranging its elements in a specific order, such as ascending or descending. In this article, we will explore the different ways to sort a list in Python, including built-in functions, methods, and external libraries

Sorting a List using Built-in Functions

Python provides two built-in functions to sort a list: sorted() and sort(). Both functions can sort a list in ascending or descending order, depending on the optional reverse parameter.

The sorted() Function

The sorted() function returns a new sorted list, leaving the original list unchanged. The syntax of the sorted() function is as follows:

sorted(iterable, key=None, reverse=False)

iterable: The iterable to be sorted, such as a list, tuple, or string.

key: A function that takes an element of the iterable as input and returns a value to use for sorting.

reverse: A Boolean value that indicates whether to sort the iterable in descending order (True) or ascending order (False, default).

Here is an example that sorts a list of integers in ascending order using the sorted() function:

numbers = [3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, 2, 6, 5, 3, 5] sorted_numbers = sorted(numbers) print(sorted_numbers) # Output: [1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 9]

You can also sort a list of strings in ascending order using the sorted() function:

fruits = ['apple', 'banana', 'cherry', 'date', 'elderberry'] sorted_fruits = sorted(fruits) print(sorted_fruits) # Output: ['apple', 'banana', 'cherry', 'date', 'elderberry']

Note that the sorted() function returns a new list, so you need to assign the result to a variable to use it.

The sort() Method

The sort() method sorts the list in place, meaning that it modifies the original list. The syntax of the sort() method is as follows:

list.sort(key=None, reverse=False)

key: A function that takes an element of the list as input and returns a value to use for sorting.

reverse: A Boolean value that indicates whether to sort the list in descending order (True) or ascending order (False, default).

Here is an example that sorts a list of integers in descending order using the sort() method:

numbers = [3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, 2, 6, 5, 3, 5] numbers.sort(reverse=True) print(numbers) # Output: [9, 6, 5, 5, 5, 4, 3, 3, 2, 1, 1]

You can also sort a list of strings in descending order using the sort() method:

fruits = ['apple', 'banana', 'cherry', 'date', 'elderberry'] fruits.sort(reverse=True) print(fruits) # Output: ['elderberry', 'date', 'cherry', 'banana', 'apple']

Note that the sort() method modifies the original list, so you don’t need to assign the result to a variable.

Sorting a List using External Libraries

Python provides several external libraries for sorting more complex data types or implementing custom sorting algorithms. In this section, we will explore two popular libraries: NumPy and Pandas.

Sorting a NumPy Array

To sort a NumPy array, you can use the numpy.sort() function, which returns a new sorted array, or the numpy.ndarray.sort() method to sort the array in place. The syntax of the numpy.sort() function is as follows:

numpy.sort(a, axis=-1, kind=None, order=None)

a: The array to be sorted.

axis: The axis along which to sort the array. By default, -1 sorts the array along the last axis.

kind: The sorting algorithm to use. By default, ‘quicksort’ is used.

order: The field(s) to use for sorting structured arrays.

Here is an example that sorts a one-dimensional NumPy array in ascending order using the numpy.sort() function:

import numpy as np numbers = np.array([3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, 2, 6, 5, 3, 5]) sorted_numbers = np.sort(numbers) print(sorted_numbers) # Output: [1 1 2 3 3 4 5 5 5 6 9]

You can also sort a two-dimensional NumPy array along a specific axis:

import numpy as np numbers = np.array([[3, 1], [4, 1], [5, 9], [2, 6], [5, 3]]) sorted_numbers = np.sort(numbers, axis=0) print(sorted_numbers) # Output: [[2 1], [3 1], [4 3], [5 6], [5 9]] Sorting a Pandas DataFrame

Pandas is a popular library for data manipulation and analysis in Python, and it provides powerful data structures and functions for handling tabular data. Pandas DataFrames are two-dimensional tables with labeled rows and columns.

To sort a Pandas DataFrame, you can use the sort_values() method of the DataFrame object. The sort_values() method sorts the DataFrame by one or more columns, depending on the input parameters. The syntax of the sort_values() method is as follows:

DataFrame.sort_values(by, axis=0, ascending=True, inplace=False, ignore_index=False, key=None)

by: The column(s) to use for sorting the DataFrame.

axis: The axis along which to sort the DataFrame. By default, 0 sorts the DataFrame along the rows.

ascending: A Boolean value that indicates whether to sort the DataFrame in ascending (True, default) or descending (False) order.

inplace: A Boolean value that indicates whether to sort the DataFrame in place (True) or return a new sorted DataFrame (False, default).

ignore_index: A Boolean value that indicates whether to reset the index of the sorted DataFrame (True) or keep the original index (False, default).

key: A function that takes a column of the DataFrame as input and returns a value to use for sorting.

Here is an example that sorts a Pandas DataFrame by a single column in descending order:

import pandas as pd data = {'name': ['Alice', 'Bob', 'Charlie', 'David', 'Eve'], 'age': [25, 20, 30, 35, 28], 'salary': [50000, 40000, 60000, 70000, 55000]} df = pd.DataFrame(data) sorted_df = df.sort_values(by='salary', ascending=False) print(sorted_df) # Output: # name age salary # 3 David 35 70000 # 2 Charlie 30 60000 # 4 Eve 28 55000 # 0 Alice 25 50000 # 1 Bob 20 40000

You can also sort a Pandas DataFrame by multiple columns:

import pandas as pd data = {'name': ['Alice', 'Bob', 'Charlie', 'David', 'Eve'], 'age': [25, 20, 30, 35, 28], 'salary': [50000, 40000, 60000, 70000, 55000]} df = pd.DataFrame(data) sorted_df = df.sort_values(by=['salary', 'age'], ascending=[False, True]) print(sorted_df) # Output: # name age salary # 3 David 35 70000 # 2 Charlie 30 60000 # 4 Eve 28 55000 # 0 Alice 25 50000 # 1 Bob 20 40000 Conclusion

Sorting a list is a fundamental task in programming, and Python provides several ways to accomplish it. In this article, we explored the built-in functions sorted() and sort(), as well as the external libraries NumPy and Pandas. We also covered the relevant parameters and options for each method, including sorting by multiple columns and custom sorting functions. By understanding these methods, you can sort lists and other data types in Python efficiently and effectively.

Step By Step Guide To Create Search Box In Excel

Search Box in Excel

Search Box in Excel is a customized feature that lets you easily locate and highlight specific data in a worksheet. It’s like searching for a book in a library. If you know the book’s title, you can search for it in the catalog instead of searching through every book on the shelves.

Similarly, the Search Box lets you quickly locate specific words or numbers in a large dataset. It helps you find what you need without manually searching through everything.

Search Box in Excel Syntax

=SEARCH(search_text, within_text, [start_num])

where:

search_text (required argument): 

This is the text or substring you want to search for within the larger text string.

within_text (required argument): 

This is the text string to search for the search_text.

start_num (optional argument):

 This is the starting position from which you want to begin the search. If omitted, Excel assumes it to be 1 (the beginning of the text string).

Please remember that the SEARCH function in Excel is case-insensitive, which means it will not distinguish between uppercase and lowercase letters. If a case-sensitive search is necessary, use the FIND function, which has a similar syntax but is case-sensitive.

How to Create a Search Box in Excel?

Now, let’s use some examples to understand how to create your own Search Box in Excel.

Examples of Search Box in Excel

You can download this Search Box Excel Template here – Search Box Excel Template

Example #1

Consider that you have the data of a company that sells and purchases used vehicles. However, the enormous amount of data makes searching for a particular car model name difficult. To simplify this process, you want to create a search box in Excel that highlights all values related to “Scooter” instead of manually searching through every cell.

Solution:

1. Open an Excel worksheet and go to the cell where you wish to create the search box. Here, we have selected G1 as the search box cell. You can highlight the selected cell to distinguish it from other cells.

The formula used above is deciphered after the last step for this example.

This simplifies the process of looking for any value. For example, after highlighting the fields related to Scooter, we can further refine our search results by applying a filter based on the color of those highlighted fields.

Now let’s understand the meaning of the parameters used in the Search formula and how it worked for us in Excel.

Explanation of Formula

Let’s have a look at each parameter individually.

1. $G$1

=SEARCH($G$1, $A2&$B2&$C2&$D2)

2. $A2&

This is the text string within which we want to search for the value specified in G9. The “&” symbol will join or concatenate the values in cells A2, B2, C2, and D2 into one string.

This is how it can help simplify the search process.

We can even use filters to perform a search as we did above, but then we would need to apply multiple filters to look for multiple things. Moreover, the example that we saw here had limited data. There may be cases when the amount of data in a sheet is huge. A Search Box can help us in all such situations as it creates a search criterion for the entire sheet.

Example #2

To create a search box in Excel, use the FILTER function (here, we are not applying a filter), an easy and efficient way to filter data based on criteria. Here are the steps to create a search box in Excel using the FILTER function, along with the following illustration for better understanding:

Solution:

Here’s the role of each part of the formula:

B3:D12: This is the range of values that you want to filter.

C3:C12=G2: This is the criteria that you want to use for filtering. Adjust it based on your specific criteria. This example compares the values in the range C3:C12 with the value in cell G2 (the value entered in the search box).

“NO MATCH FOUND”: This value will get displayed in the result box if no entries meet the filtering criteria. You can customize it to your preference.

With the FILTER function, you can easily create a search box in Excel that dynamically filters data based on your criteria, making it a powerful tool for data analysis and manipulation.

Things to Remember

Make sure that you enter the formula correctly in the conditional formatting window.

Use the $ sign as shown in Example 1 to ensure no deviation.

The & sign is useful for adding more columns in the formula. Ensure not to put the & sign at the end of the formula.

Though both Search Box and Filters are useful for fetching outputs based on various conditions, we should not use them interchangeably as they solve unique purposes in different manners. This box can also be useful to enhance the function of a filter.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Q1. Where is the search bar on Excel? Q2. Why is my search box not working in Excel?

Answer: There could be many reasons why the Microsoft Excel search box or “Find” tool isn’t working. Some possible explanations and solutions are as follows:

No text or value to search: Check that you have entered the correct search text or value in the search box’s “Find what” Excel may be unable to find matches if the search text is blank or contains a typo.

Active cell outside the search range: Excel looks for text or values within the current worksheet or range. Make certain that the active cell is within the search range. Excel may be unable to find matches if the active cell is outside the search range.

Incorrect search options: Excel’s “Find” tool provides several search options, including match case, search direction, and search by rows or columns. Check that you’ve selected the appropriate options based on your search criteria. Excel may be unable to find matches if the search options are not properly configured.

Protected worksheet: If the worksheet or workbook is password-protected or has restricted permissions, the “Find” tool may not function as expected. In such cases, you may need to unprotect the worksheet or workbook before using the “Find”

Excel version or installation issues: Excel version or installation issues: In some cases, problems with Excel itself, such as software bugs or installation errors, can interfere with the “Find” tool’s functionality. In such situations, you may need to update or reinstall Excel or contact Microsoft or your IT department for assistance.

Suppose you’ve checked all the above options, and the search box still doesn’t work in Excel. In that case, it’s best to consult the Excel document or Help feature or contact Microsoft support or your IT department for further troubleshooting and resolution.

Q3. What are the functions of a search bar?

Answer: A search bar is a tool that allows users to find specific content within a dataset. It has filtering capabilities auto-suggestion feature and can function as a navigation tool. It may also provide error handling, a history, and personalized recommendations. Finally, search results are visible for users to browse and select from.

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to Search Box in Excel. Here we discuss How to Create a Search Box in Excel and the Usage of a Search Box in Excel, along with practical examples and a downloadable Excel template. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

Insertion Sort Vs Bubble Sort

Difference Between Insertion sort vs Bubble sort

Computer Science comprises various data structures and algorithms that the user may implement for executing to complete a certain task or to solve any problem. Some classical algorithms are most familiar, such as bubble sort, insertion sort and merge sort, and others.

While talking about Insertion sort, it is an easy sorting algorithm that functions in the same way as we sort the playing cards in our hands. Here, the array will be practically split into a sorted as well as an unsorted portion. After that, the values available from the unsorted portion will be picked and then positioned correctly in the sorted portion.

Also, on the other side, the Bubble sort, which is also stated as comparison sort, is the easiest but quite ineffective type of algorithm for sorting, which goes through the list iterating, comparing neighboring items, and doing required swapping if present in an improper order. This bubble sorting is said to be necessary to know since it represents the basic foundations of sorting.

Head to Head Comparison Between Insertion sort vs Bubble sort (Infographics)

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Key differences between Insertion sort vs Bubble sort

Some of the key differences between Insertion sort vs Bubble sort are given below:

Basically, sorting can be defined as assembling elements either in descending or ascending order. This technique is approximately classified as internal and external sorting. In the internal sorting, all elements to be sorted are present in the main memory. Similarly, in the external sorting, when few sorts cannot be executed in the main memory, then they are performed on tape or disk.

In sorting algorithms, Bubble sort is to be considered as the humblest one. Here, the method visits through the entire array and then relates each neighboring number, where it interchanges the numbers, and it lasts till the list be present in ascending order.

Insertion sort algorithm places an unsorted item at its suitable position in every iteration that occurs through the array. This InsertionSort() function repeats over the array as well as evaluates the two elements at a time with the following algorithm instructions supposing that we need to sort an array having size as v in rising order:

Repeat from arr[1] to the last arr[v] over the array.

Match the current item or key to its predecessor.

If the predecessor is greater than the key element then, it will be compared to the items before.

Shift the larger items one place up so that it helps to create space for the swapped item

In addition, when we merge the concepts of sorting algorithm techniques used in both the InsertionSort() and BubbleSort() functions, then it will create a new sorting method known as Merge Sort or the MergeAndSort() function, which works with two arrays while splitting array to compare and sorting respectively. This process may take some time.

For sorting algorithms, numerical order, as well as lexicographical order, are mostly implemented. In addition, these sorting algorithms give an introduction to a variety of core algorithm ideas that include Big O notation, data structures, divide and conquer algorithms, best, average and worst-case analysis, lower bounds, and time-space tradeoffs.

For classic sorting algorithms, bad behavior is denoted by O(n2), and good behavior is denoted by O(n log n). Few of the algorithms may be recursive or non-recursive.

Bubble sort is also known to be Sinking Sort which iterates through the list of data and sorts the adjacent items using the swap technique to avoid wrong order.

Taking an illustration as a list:

After this, the second pass and a needed third pass will continue unless we get the sorted list. Thus, the Bubble sort goes through the whole array of elements in a pass comparing neighboring ones.

Taking the previous list for illustrating the insertion sort, then it will work through a pile, firstly getting an element and matching to the primary item, if found greater swaps and then again taking two elements and sorting starts for sorted position and ends up till all elements are invalid order as:

After this, as the list shows an ascended order, the algorithm or insertion sort stops further iteration and generates the output (12358).

Comparison table between Insertion sort vs Bubble sort

Please find the below comparison table for Insertion sort and Bubble Sort with few points:

Insertion Sort Bubble Sort

It is a simple type of sorting algorithm that creates the last sorted list by shifting one element at a time. It is a modest algorithm for sorting, which iterates through the list by matching contiguous pairs and then changing them when found in the wrong order.

Relocates an item at a time to the partly sorted array. Checks the adjacent items and then swaps them consequently.

This sort is twice as quick as bubble sort. This sort is leisurelier than the insertion sort.

A bit complex than bubble sort. It is quite an easy and simple one, not much difficult.

Best case complexity: O(N) Best case complexity: O(N)

It is adaptive as it delivers a minimum number of steps concentrated for the partially sorted array. Implements optimized approach, have fewer lines of code being easy to read and is able to be plugged in anywhere in the program.

It is stable with less number of swaps with an equally fast running case. It also defines a stable sort that will not alter the relative order of items having similar keys.

It is proficient for small data sets, and this Insertion sort works in the same way as we sort the playing cards. Bubble sort is actually very beneficial when a user needs to check the top x values available in a list.

Time complexity is O(n+d). Here, the d denotes the count of inversions. Time complexity is O(n^2).

In place, it means this sort needs just a constant amount O(1) of extra memory space. In place, it means using no auxiliary type data structure; the input is transformed having small memory space utilization.

Online: this sorting algorithm is able to sort a list of records as it receives them. It also operates on the data for sorting as delivered.

Conclusion

Insertion and Bubble sorts are helpful standard algorithms required for ordering data records properly. If the records can be sorted resourcefully, then that adds value to the sorting algorithms.

If the sorting algorithms work efficiently, then the time complexity of a given problem can be minimized. But anyhow, among the two sorts, the bubble sort is slower than insertion one as well as the simplest and easy one to execute.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to Insertion sort vs Bubble sort. Here we discuss the Insertion sort vs Bubble sort key differences with infographics and comparison table. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

How To Validate A Date Pattern In Javascript?

In this tutorial, we will learn how to validate a date pattern in JavaScript.

The Date object in JavaScript represents a single point in time in a platform-independent way. It carries a number representing time in milliseconds since January 1, 1970, at 00:00:00. (UTC). The Date object can format differently, so it is essential to validate a date pattern before using it.

In this tutorial, we will discuss two ways to validate a date pattern in JavaScript −

Using the getTime() method

Using the Date constructor and split() method

Validate a Date Pattern using the getTime() Method

In JavaScript, the getTime() method returns the time in milliseconds since January 1, 1970, at 00:00:00. (UTC). Firstly, we create a JavaScript date object by passing the date pattern in the Date constructor, and then we call the getTime() method on it. If the provided pattern is invalid, this method returns NaN (not a number).

Syntax const isValid = new Date('14/14/2024').getTime() console.log(isValid) if (isNaN(isValid)) { console.log('Date pattern is invalid') } else { console.log('Date pattern is valid') }

In the above syntax, we use a date pattern ‘14/14/2024’ to create a Date object and use the getTime() method. After that, the return value of the getTime() method is checked to determine whether it is NaN or not using the isNaN() method. If the value is NaN, then the date pattern is invalid.

Example

.

element

{

padding

:

15

px

;

margin

top

:

5

px

;

background

color

:

rgb

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224

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border

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date1

=

‘1/1/2024’

const

date2

=

’14/14/2024′

const

date3

=

’10-10-2000′

const

date4

=

’32-32-2000′

const

date5

=

‘January 1 2023’

const

date6

=

‘January 35 2023’

function

validatePattern

(

)

{

element1

.

innerHTML

=

date1

+

‘ = ‘

+

validate

(

date1

)

element2

.

innerHTML

=

date2

+

‘ = ‘

+

validate

(

date2

)

element3

.

innerHTML

=

date3

+

‘ = ‘

+

validate

(

date3

)

element4

.

innerHTML

=

date4

+

‘ = ‘

+

validate

(

date4

)

element5

.

innerHTML

=

date5

+

‘ = ‘

+

validate

(

date5

)

element6

.

innerHTML

=

date6

+

‘ = ‘

+

validate

(

date6

)

}

function

validate

(

pattern

)

{

const

isValid

=

new

Date

(

pattern

)

.

getTime

(

)

if

(

isNaN

(

isValid

)

)

{

return

‘invalid’

}

else

{

return

‘valid’

}

}

Validate a Date Pattern using the Date Constructor and split() Method

In this approach, we take the date pattern and split it into an array using the split() method; then, we create a JavaScript date object with the array elements. After that, we check the date object’s month, date, and year with the date pattern. If the Date object is invalid or the day, month, or year does not match the date pattern, then the date pattern should be considered invalid. This approach can only be used for the ‘MM/DD/YYYY’ type of date pattern.

Syntax function validate(date) { var split = date.split('/') var date = new Date(split[2] + '/' + split[0] + '/' + split[1]) return ( date && date.getMonth() + 1 == split[0] && date.getDate() == Number(split[1]) && date.getFullYear() == Number(split[2]) ) }

In the above syntax, the validate function uses the Date constructor and split method to validate the date pattern.

Example

<

div id

=

“root”

function

validatePattern

(

)

{

const

date_pattern

=

document

.

getElementById

(

‘date-pattern’

)

.

value

const

root

=

document

.

getElementById

(

‘root’

)

root

.

innerHTML

=

date_pattern

+

‘ = ‘

+

validate

(

date_pattern

)

}

function

validate

(

date

)

{

var

split

=

date

.

split

(

‘/’

)

var

date

=

new

Date

(

split

[

2

]

+

‘/’

+

split

[

0

]

+

‘/’

+

split

[

1

]

)

return

(

date

&&

date

.

getMonth

(

)

+

1

==

split

[

0

]

&&

date

.

getDate

(

)

==

Number

(

split

[

1

]

)

&&

date

.

getFullYear

(

)

==

Number

(

split

[

2

]

)

)

}

In this tutorial, we have learned how to validate date patterns with JavaScript. We have discussed two approaches: the getTime() method and the Date constructor and split() method. Users can follow any of these as per their requirements.

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