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In Python, the enumerate() function associates list elements with an index. The most notable use case for the enumerate() function is to create a for loop with an index in Python. Instead of manually updating an index, the enumerate() function takes care of that.

For example, let’s print a list of names and their corresponding indexes:

names = ["Alice", "Bob", "Charlie"] for position, name in enumerate(names): print(f"{name}: {position}")

Output:

Alice: 0 Bob: 1 Charlie: 2

This is a comprehensive guide to the enumerate() function in Python. You will learn what problems the enumerate() function solves. Besides, you’ll understand what the enumerate() function does and what is an enumerate object.

Let’s start by looking at the issues that come with traditional for loops.

Problems with For Loops in Python

In Python, a for loop performs a collection-based iteration. The loop assigns the next iterable element to a temporary looping variable for each iteration. This sounds fancy but it’s what you’ve probably already seen countless times:

letters = ["A", "B", "C"] for letter in letters: print(letter)

Output:

A B C

In this example, the for loop goes through the letters in the list. It assigns each letter to the temporary looping variable letter with which you can access each letter in the list one by one.

But what if you’d also like to access the index of the letters in the list?

To do this, you need to create a separate variable you update during the iteration:

letters = ["A", "B", "C"] index = 0 for letter in letters: print(letter, index) index += 1

Output:

A 0 B 1 C 2

The common problem with keeping track of an index manually is forgetting to update it.

letters = ["A", "B", "C"] index = 0 for letter in letters: print(letter, index)

Output:

A 0 B 0 C 0

This piece of code keeps the index at zero because you forgot to update it at the end of each iteration. Even though in this situation, it’s clear to see what causes the problem, it can be hard to track it down in a more complex code project.

This is where the built-in enumerate() function helps.

The enumerate() Function in Python

In Python, the enumerate() function associates an index with each list element. It takes a list as an argument and returns an enumerate object with index, and value pairs.

Using enumerate is easy. Just call enumerate() function by passing a list as an argument.

enumerate(values)

This return an enumerate object that has each list element associated with an index (that starts at 0 by default)

The best way to learn how to use the enumerate() function is by examples.

Example

In the previous example, you learned a common bug that can occur when looping through lists with an index.

With the enumerate() function, this problem is gone. The enumerate() function automatically assigns an index to each list element. Moreover, you need less code and the overall code readability improves.

For example, let’s print the indexes of the letters in a list:

letters = ["A", "B", "C"] for index, letter in enumerate(letters): print(letter, index)

Output:

A 0 B 1 C 2 Enumerate() Return Value

Let’s talk about the return value of the enumerate() function. As opposed to what you thought, the return value is not a list of index, value pairs. Instead, it’s a special enumerate object that consists of the index, value pairs.

For example, let’s enumerate a list of names and print the result:

names = ["Alice", "Bob", "Charlie"] names_with_index = enumerate(names) print(names_with_index)

Output:

This is the textual representation of the enumerate object that the enumerate() call returns. If you need to, you can convert the enumerate object to a list with the built-in list() function.

But you do not necessarily have to do this. Instead, you can loop through the enumerate object just like a list in Python. This is because an enumerate object is iterable object that supports for loops.

How to Start enumerate() from Non-Zero Value

By default, the enumerate() function starts indexing at 0 because, in Python, the indexing starts at 0.

But sometimes this is not what you want. For example, if you’re printing the positions of people in a queue, you don’t want to start at 0 but 1 instead.

The naive solution would just be to add or subtract value from the index. But this is not the most Pythonic way to do it.

This is when you can specify the optional argument, start, in the enumerate() function call.

enumerate(values, start=index)

For example, let’s print the names of persons in a queue associated with their position on the line by starting the indexing at 1:

names = ["Alice", "Bob", "Charlie"] for position, name in enumerate(names, start=1): print(f"{name}: {position}")

Output:

Alice: 1 Bob: 2 Charlie: 3 Enumerate() Is Not Only for Lists

So far you have worked with lists and enumerate(). But it is good to know you are not restricted to using it on lists only.

In fact, you can call it on any iterable type, such as a tuple or a string in Python.

Example 1: Tuples and enumerate()

For example, let’s call the enumerate() function on a tuple of names:

names = ("Alice", "Bob", "Charlie") names_with_index = enumerate(names) print(tuple(names_with_index))

Output:

((0, 'Alice'), (1, 'Bob'), (2, 'Charlie'))

The behavior of this example is exactly the same as if you called enumerate() on a list.

Example 2: Strings and enumerate()

Similar to how tuples and lists are iterables in Python, so is a string.

This means you can also call enumerate() on a string. When called on a string, the enumerate() function associates each character of the string with an index.

For example:

word = "Hello" for idx, char in enumerate(word): print(idx, char)

Output:

0 H 1 e 2 l 3 l 4 o Conclusion

Today you learned what the enumerate() function does in python.

The enumerate() function assigns an index for each element of an iterable, such as a list.

Using enumerate() is useful when you want to keep track of the index of the elements of an iterable. With enumerate() you don’t need to manually keep track of the loop index.

Thanks for reading. I hope you find it useful.

Happy coding!

Further Reading

Python Tips and Tricks

You're reading Enumerate() In Python: A Step

When Should A Developer Step In?

When Should a Developer Step In?

“Okay, I’m starting the next match. Everyone hold hands, and stay together!” That’s what one of my Xbox LIVE friends used to say in Modern Warfare. (And yes, it’s corny, but that’s what it feels like. Like we’re kids on a school field trip, trying not to lose one of our classmates.) It carried over to the second title in that story arc, and I remember us making jokes about it in Call of Duty: World at War. Before we finally decided to put Black Ops to the side, and focus on other games that didn’t suffer from these issues, we were joking about it yet again. The party system in Call of Duty is broken, and it’s a poor excuse for how it should work. You don’t even need to compare it to competitive titles like Bungie Studios’ Halo series to realize it’s broken. It just doesn’t work.

Truth be told, while my friends and I were suffering from these issues, and I know there were a few scattering reports of the same problem happening to others on the Xbox 360, it pales in comparison to what’s happening to PlayStation 3 owners. And even if I hadn’t gone through the same problems, I would still be sitting here, feeling your pain. I would still be wondering what, exactly, a developer can do to assuage those who bought their game, and feel like they literally got robbed. Of course, there’s no denying that developers put a ridiculous amount of time in their games; as well as energy, skill, and creativity. (Even if some people don’t think a certain game is creative, it was to at least one person out there, so that’s enough.) And I’m not here to point out any problems with how developers make their games. The trouble –the problem– comes afterwards.

So what should a developer do? Some say they should reimburse players affected by the issues — and with the money that Black Ops is making, that probably wouldn’t be too hard to do. Others think that even just a free add-on would suffice. While still others believe that just giving the game up entirely, and writing off the developer and title is what’s best for everyone. Obviously, Treyarch doesn’t want you to do that. And neither does Activision. But when you’ve got a game like Black Ops, with one of the main selling points its online multiplayer function, and it doesn’t work? A developer shouldn’t be surprised that people are calling them out, threatening to do all sorts of things.

And let’s not forget about the fact that Black Ops’ first piece of downloadable content (DLC) is heading to the Xbox 360 first, and won’t even be available for PlayStation 3 owners until a month later, at least. Another stab at PS3 owners. And one that just drives home the point that their console of choice is being shunned, at least when it comes to this game, and there doesn’t seem to be much hope. Should Treyarch and Activision let PlayStation 3 owners download the map pack, called First Strike, for free, when it comes out? There would surely be an uproar from 360 owners, especially those who have suffered from online connectivity issues.

So, what, then? What does a developer do? Is there anything for them to do, except continuously say that they are working tirelessly to fix the problem with patches and hot fixes? And then, what happens when the patch actually makes things worse, like patch 1.04? Perhaps a developer’s tactic should be to try and fix the problem, keep trying to fix it, but if nothing they’re trying is working, they provide an extra goodie to gamers. A free map? Maybe credits to use in the game, so they can buy more weapons, perks, or anything else they want? How about offer some money into their digital wallets?

I can’t say for sure what I believe a developer should do. If a game gets to the point that Black Ops has, with no sign of it getting better (or the console getting any real support, before the competition’s system), I’m not sure there’s any way to really come back. If you’ve already gotten rid of the game, and you start hearing that everything has been fixed, are you really going to buy it again? I’m sure there will be some people out there, but the trade-in has already been finalized. Treyarch and Activision will lose out on those used games being sold back to gamers.

Let me know what you think a developer should do. If you think they should do anything at all. Even if you don’t have a PS3, or you aren’t suffering from the problem. Do you think the developers out there owe it to gamers who bought the game some kind of additional content, or even money, because the game isn’t up to par? Or do they just keep trying to fix it, and leave it at that?

Step By Step Guide To Create Search Box In Excel

Search Box in Excel

Search Box in Excel is a customized feature that lets you easily locate and highlight specific data in a worksheet. It’s like searching for a book in a library. If you know the book’s title, you can search for it in the catalog instead of searching through every book on the shelves.

Similarly, the Search Box lets you quickly locate specific words or numbers in a large dataset. It helps you find what you need without manually searching through everything.

Search Box in Excel Syntax

=SEARCH(search_text, within_text, [start_num])

where:

search_text (required argument): 

This is the text or substring you want to search for within the larger text string.

within_text (required argument): 

This is the text string to search for the search_text.

start_num (optional argument):

 This is the starting position from which you want to begin the search. If omitted, Excel assumes it to be 1 (the beginning of the text string).

Please remember that the SEARCH function in Excel is case-insensitive, which means it will not distinguish between uppercase and lowercase letters. If a case-sensitive search is necessary, use the FIND function, which has a similar syntax but is case-sensitive.

How to Create a Search Box in Excel?

Now, let’s use some examples to understand how to create your own Search Box in Excel.

Examples of Search Box in Excel

You can download this Search Box Excel Template here – Search Box Excel Template

Example #1

Consider that you have the data of a company that sells and purchases used vehicles. However, the enormous amount of data makes searching for a particular car model name difficult. To simplify this process, you want to create a search box in Excel that highlights all values related to “Scooter” instead of manually searching through every cell.

Solution:

1. Open an Excel worksheet and go to the cell where you wish to create the search box. Here, we have selected G1 as the search box cell. You can highlight the selected cell to distinguish it from other cells.

The formula used above is deciphered after the last step for this example.

This simplifies the process of looking for any value. For example, after highlighting the fields related to Scooter, we can further refine our search results by applying a filter based on the color of those highlighted fields.

Now let’s understand the meaning of the parameters used in the Search formula and how it worked for us in Excel.

Explanation of Formula

Let’s have a look at each parameter individually.

1. $G$1

=SEARCH($G$1, $A2&$B2&$C2&$D2)

2. $A2&

This is the text string within which we want to search for the value specified in G9. The “&” symbol will join or concatenate the values in cells A2, B2, C2, and D2 into one string.

This is how it can help simplify the search process.

We can even use filters to perform a search as we did above, but then we would need to apply multiple filters to look for multiple things. Moreover, the example that we saw here had limited data. There may be cases when the amount of data in a sheet is huge. A Search Box can help us in all such situations as it creates a search criterion for the entire sheet.

Example #2

To create a search box in Excel, use the FILTER function (here, we are not applying a filter), an easy and efficient way to filter data based on criteria. Here are the steps to create a search box in Excel using the FILTER function, along with the following illustration for better understanding:

Solution:

Here’s the role of each part of the formula:

B3:D12: This is the range of values that you want to filter.

C3:C12=G2: This is the criteria that you want to use for filtering. Adjust it based on your specific criteria. This example compares the values in the range C3:C12 with the value in cell G2 (the value entered in the search box).

“NO MATCH FOUND”: This value will get displayed in the result box if no entries meet the filtering criteria. You can customize it to your preference.

With the FILTER function, you can easily create a search box in Excel that dynamically filters data based on your criteria, making it a powerful tool for data analysis and manipulation.

Things to Remember

Make sure that you enter the formula correctly in the conditional formatting window.

Use the $ sign as shown in Example 1 to ensure no deviation.

The & sign is useful for adding more columns in the formula. Ensure not to put the & sign at the end of the formula.

Though both Search Box and Filters are useful for fetching outputs based on various conditions, we should not use them interchangeably as they solve unique purposes in different manners. This box can also be useful to enhance the function of a filter.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Q1. Where is the search bar on Excel? Q2. Why is my search box not working in Excel?

Answer: There could be many reasons why the Microsoft Excel search box or “Find” tool isn’t working. Some possible explanations and solutions are as follows:

No text or value to search: Check that you have entered the correct search text or value in the search box’s “Find what” Excel may be unable to find matches if the search text is blank or contains a typo.

Active cell outside the search range: Excel looks for text or values within the current worksheet or range. Make certain that the active cell is within the search range. Excel may be unable to find matches if the active cell is outside the search range.

Incorrect search options: Excel’s “Find” tool provides several search options, including match case, search direction, and search by rows or columns. Check that you’ve selected the appropriate options based on your search criteria. Excel may be unable to find matches if the search options are not properly configured.

Protected worksheet: If the worksheet or workbook is password-protected or has restricted permissions, the “Find” tool may not function as expected. In such cases, you may need to unprotect the worksheet or workbook before using the “Find”

Excel version or installation issues: Excel version or installation issues: In some cases, problems with Excel itself, such as software bugs or installation errors, can interfere with the “Find” tool’s functionality. In such situations, you may need to update or reinstall Excel or contact Microsoft or your IT department for assistance.

Suppose you’ve checked all the above options, and the search box still doesn’t work in Excel. In that case, it’s best to consult the Excel document or Help feature or contact Microsoft support or your IT department for further troubleshooting and resolution.

Q3. What are the functions of a search bar?

Answer: A search bar is a tool that allows users to find specific content within a dataset. It has filtering capabilities auto-suggestion feature and can function as a navigation tool. It may also provide error handling, a history, and personalized recommendations. Finally, search results are visible for users to browse and select from.

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to Search Box in Excel. Here we discuss How to Create a Search Box in Excel and the Usage of a Search Box in Excel, along with practical examples and a downloadable Excel template. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

How To Sort A List In Python

Sorting is an essential task in programming, and Python provides several ways to sort a list. A list is a mutable sequence data type that stores a collection of items, such as integers, strings, or objects. Sorting a list means arranging its elements in a specific order, such as ascending or descending. In this article, we will explore the different ways to sort a list in Python, including built-in functions, methods, and external libraries

Sorting a List using Built-in Functions

Python provides two built-in functions to sort a list: sorted() and sort(). Both functions can sort a list in ascending or descending order, depending on the optional reverse parameter.

The sorted() Function

The sorted() function returns a new sorted list, leaving the original list unchanged. The syntax of the sorted() function is as follows:

sorted(iterable, key=None, reverse=False)

iterable: The iterable to be sorted, such as a list, tuple, or string.

key: A function that takes an element of the iterable as input and returns a value to use for sorting.

reverse: A Boolean value that indicates whether to sort the iterable in descending order (True) or ascending order (False, default).

Here is an example that sorts a list of integers in ascending order using the sorted() function:

numbers = [3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, 2, 6, 5, 3, 5] sorted_numbers = sorted(numbers) print(sorted_numbers) # Output: [1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 9]

You can also sort a list of strings in ascending order using the sorted() function:

fruits = ['apple', 'banana', 'cherry', 'date', 'elderberry'] sorted_fruits = sorted(fruits) print(sorted_fruits) # Output: ['apple', 'banana', 'cherry', 'date', 'elderberry']

Note that the sorted() function returns a new list, so you need to assign the result to a variable to use it.

The sort() Method

The sort() method sorts the list in place, meaning that it modifies the original list. The syntax of the sort() method is as follows:

list.sort(key=None, reverse=False)

key: A function that takes an element of the list as input and returns a value to use for sorting.

reverse: A Boolean value that indicates whether to sort the list in descending order (True) or ascending order (False, default).

Here is an example that sorts a list of integers in descending order using the sort() method:

numbers = [3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, 2, 6, 5, 3, 5] numbers.sort(reverse=True) print(numbers) # Output: [9, 6, 5, 5, 5, 4, 3, 3, 2, 1, 1]

You can also sort a list of strings in descending order using the sort() method:

fruits = ['apple', 'banana', 'cherry', 'date', 'elderberry'] fruits.sort(reverse=True) print(fruits) # Output: ['elderberry', 'date', 'cherry', 'banana', 'apple']

Note that the sort() method modifies the original list, so you don’t need to assign the result to a variable.

Sorting a List using External Libraries

Python provides several external libraries for sorting more complex data types or implementing custom sorting algorithms. In this section, we will explore two popular libraries: NumPy and Pandas.

Sorting a NumPy Array

To sort a NumPy array, you can use the numpy.sort() function, which returns a new sorted array, or the numpy.ndarray.sort() method to sort the array in place. The syntax of the numpy.sort() function is as follows:

numpy.sort(a, axis=-1, kind=None, order=None)

a: The array to be sorted.

axis: The axis along which to sort the array. By default, -1 sorts the array along the last axis.

kind: The sorting algorithm to use. By default, ‘quicksort’ is used.

order: The field(s) to use for sorting structured arrays.

Here is an example that sorts a one-dimensional NumPy array in ascending order using the numpy.sort() function:

import numpy as np numbers = np.array([3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, 2, 6, 5, 3, 5]) sorted_numbers = np.sort(numbers) print(sorted_numbers) # Output: [1 1 2 3 3 4 5 5 5 6 9]

You can also sort a two-dimensional NumPy array along a specific axis:

import numpy as np numbers = np.array([[3, 1], [4, 1], [5, 9], [2, 6], [5, 3]]) sorted_numbers = np.sort(numbers, axis=0) print(sorted_numbers) # Output: [[2 1], [3 1], [4 3], [5 6], [5 9]] Sorting a Pandas DataFrame

Pandas is a popular library for data manipulation and analysis in Python, and it provides powerful data structures and functions for handling tabular data. Pandas DataFrames are two-dimensional tables with labeled rows and columns.

To sort a Pandas DataFrame, you can use the sort_values() method of the DataFrame object. The sort_values() method sorts the DataFrame by one or more columns, depending on the input parameters. The syntax of the sort_values() method is as follows:

DataFrame.sort_values(by, axis=0, ascending=True, inplace=False, ignore_index=False, key=None)

by: The column(s) to use for sorting the DataFrame.

axis: The axis along which to sort the DataFrame. By default, 0 sorts the DataFrame along the rows.

ascending: A Boolean value that indicates whether to sort the DataFrame in ascending (True, default) or descending (False) order.

inplace: A Boolean value that indicates whether to sort the DataFrame in place (True) or return a new sorted DataFrame (False, default).

ignore_index: A Boolean value that indicates whether to reset the index of the sorted DataFrame (True) or keep the original index (False, default).

key: A function that takes a column of the DataFrame as input and returns a value to use for sorting.

Here is an example that sorts a Pandas DataFrame by a single column in descending order:

import pandas as pd data = {'name': ['Alice', 'Bob', 'Charlie', 'David', 'Eve'], 'age': [25, 20, 30, 35, 28], 'salary': [50000, 40000, 60000, 70000, 55000]} df = pd.DataFrame(data) sorted_df = df.sort_values(by='salary', ascending=False) print(sorted_df) # Output: # name age salary # 3 David 35 70000 # 2 Charlie 30 60000 # 4 Eve 28 55000 # 0 Alice 25 50000 # 1 Bob 20 40000

You can also sort a Pandas DataFrame by multiple columns:

import pandas as pd data = {'name': ['Alice', 'Bob', 'Charlie', 'David', 'Eve'], 'age': [25, 20, 30, 35, 28], 'salary': [50000, 40000, 60000, 70000, 55000]} df = pd.DataFrame(data) sorted_df = df.sort_values(by=['salary', 'age'], ascending=[False, True]) print(sorted_df) # Output: # name age salary # 3 David 35 70000 # 2 Charlie 30 60000 # 4 Eve 28 55000 # 0 Alice 25 50000 # 1 Bob 20 40000 Conclusion

Sorting a list is a fundamental task in programming, and Python provides several ways to accomplish it. In this article, we explored the built-in functions sorted() and sort(), as well as the external libraries NumPy and Pandas. We also covered the relevant parameters and options for each method, including sorting by multiple columns and custom sorting functions. By understanding these methods, you can sort lists and other data types in Python efficiently and effectively.

How To Iterate Through A Dictionary In Python?

Dictionaries are a valuable and frequently used data structure in Python. This article tells us how to traverse through a dictionary while performing operations on its key-value pairs.

Using dict.items() Method

Python’s dict.items() method allows you to loop through the dictionary. Each repetition will provide you with both the key and value of each item.

Example

Following is an example to iterate through a dictionary using dict.items() method −

‘Novel’

:

‘Pride and Prejudice’

,

‘year’

:

‘1813’

,

‘author’

:

‘Jane Austen’

,

‘character’

:

‘Elizabeth Bennet’

}

for

keys

,

values

in

dictionary

.

items

(

)

:

print

(

keys

,

values

)

Output

Following is an output of the above code.

Novel Pride and Prejudice year 1813 author Jane Austen character Elizabeth Bennet Using Keys() Method

To iterate through the dictionary’s keys, utilise the keys() method that is supplied by the dictionary. An iterable of the keys available in the dictionary is returned. Then, as seen below, you can cycle through the keys using a for loop.

Example – 1

Following is an example to iterate through a dictionary using keys() method −

‘Novel’

:

‘Pride and Prejudice’

,

‘year’

:

‘1813’

,

‘author’

:

‘Jane Austen’

,

‘character’

:

‘Elizabeth Bennet’

}

for

keys

in

dictionary

.

keys

(

)

:

print

(

keys

)

Output

Following is an output of the above code:.

Novel year author character Example – 2

If you want to get the values of the keys during each iteration, you can use the get() method, as it is demonstrated below −

‘Novel’

:

‘Pride and Prejudice’

,

‘year’

:

‘1813’

,

‘author’

:

‘Jane Austen’

,

‘character’

:

‘Elizabeth Bennet’

}

for

keys

in

dictionary

.

keys

(

)

:

print

(

dictionary

.

get

(

keys

)

)

Output

Following is an output of the above code.

Pride and Prejudice 1813 Jane Austen Elizabeth Bennet Using Values() Method

To iterate through the values of the dictionary elements, utilise the values() method that the dictionary provides.

An iterable of all the values for each item that is available in the dictionary is returned. You can then go through the numbers as shown below by using a for loop.

Example

This approach prevents access to the dictionary keys(), which is typically not required. As a result, iterating through the dictionary using this way is the quickest method.

The items() method offered by the Python dictionary allows you to loop through the dictionary entries.

Following is an example to iterate through a dictionary using values() method −

‘Novel’

:

‘Pride and Prejudice’

,

‘year’

:

‘1813’

,

‘author’

:

‘Jane Austen’

,

‘character’

:

‘Elizabeth Bennet’

}

for

values

in

dictionary

.

values

(

)

:

print

(

values

)

Output

Following is an output of the above code −

Pride and Prejudice 1813 Jane Austen Elizabeth Bennet Iterating with Index

The items’ index can be used to iterate across the dictionary.Iterating the dictionary without utilising the methods keys(), values(), or items is similar to this.

Example

Following is an example to iterate through a dictionary with index −

‘Novel’

:

‘Pride and Prejudice’

,

‘year’

:

‘1813’

,

‘author’

:

‘Jane Austen’

,

‘character’

:

‘Elizabeth Bennet’

}

for

index

in

dictionary

:

print

(

index

,

dictionary

[

index

]

)

Output

Following is an output of the above code.

Novel Pride and Prejudice year 1813 author Jane Austen character Elizabeth Bennet Iterating Over Dictionary In Alphabetical Order

Ordinarily, dictionaries don’t keep any sort of order. This implies that the iteration’s order of the items is not guaranteed. The sorted() function in Python can be used to iterate a dictionary using a given order. The item will be sorted first, after which a for loop can traverse over it.

Example

sorted(dictionary.keys()) sorts the dictionary’s keys and for iterates through the keys that the sorted function returned.

Following is an example to iterate through a dictionary with index −

‘Novel’

:

‘Pride and Prejudice’

,

‘year’

:

‘1813’

,

‘author’

:

‘Jane Austen’

,

‘character’

:

‘Elizabeth Bennet’

}

for

keys

in

sorted

(

dictionary

.

keys

(

)

)

:

print

(

keys

,

dictionary

[

keys

]

)

Output

Following is an output of the above code.

Novel Pride and Prejudice author Jane Austen character Elizabeth Bennet year 1813 Sort Using Dictionary Item Values

You must first generate a sorted set of keys before you can sort the dictionary according to its values.

The sorted keys set can then be iterated, with each iteration allowing you to access the dictionary using the key.

Example

A set of sorted keys is produced using sorted keys = sorted(dictionary,key=dictionary.get).

in sorted keys for values: – repeats the set of sorted keys

sorted_dictionary[values] = dictionary[values]–To the sorted dictionary, access the dictionary and add the value. Now, the sorted values will be present in the final dictionary. To verify the outcomes, print it.

Following is an example to sort using dictionary item values −

dictionary

=

{

'Novel'

:

'Pride and Prejudice'

,

'year'

:

'1813'

,

'author'

:

'Jane Austen'

,

'character'

:

'Elizabeth Bennet'

}

sorted_dictionary

=

{

}

sorted_key

=

sorted

(

dictionary

,

key

=

dictionary

.

get

)

for

values

in

sorted_key

:

sorted_dictionary

[

values

]

=

dictionary

[

values

]

print

(

sorted_dictionary

)

Output

Following is an output of the above code −

{'year': '1813', 'character': 'Elizabeth Bennet', 'author': 'Jane Austen', 'Novel': 'Pride and Prejudice'}

How To Reverse A String In Python In 5 Ways?

Python is one of the most popular programming languages used in various domains such as data science, web development, and automation. One of the fundamental operations in programming is reversing a string, and Python provides several ways to achieve this task. Reversing a string in Python is a basic operation that every Python developer should be familiar with, and in this guide, we will explore python reverse string!

Why Do We Need Python Reverse String?

The ability to reverse and return string is not only useful in programming but can also come in handy in everyday life. For example, you may want to reverse the order of characters in a string to create a palindrome, which is a word that is the same when read forwards and backwards. Or, you may want to reverse the order of words in a sentence to get a different perspective on its meaning. Whatever your reason for wanting to reverse a string, python provides many ways to do it.

In this article, we’ll go over five distinct approaches to string reversal in Python, each having pros and cons. Starting with the simplest and most direct method—using slicing to reverse the string—we’ll move on to more complex strategies, such employing built-in functions and recursion. We’ll also go through the time and spatial complexity of each strategy along the way so you can pick the one that best suits your requirements. We’ll also include code samples and detailed instructions for each method so you can follow along and practice the skills yourself.

Whether you’re a beginner just starting with Python or an experienced developer looking for a new perspective, this guide has something to offer. By the end of this guide, you will have a better understanding of the different ways to reverse a string in Python, and you’ll be able to choose the most appropriate approach for your specific use case. So, let’s dive into the world of Python string reversal and discover the many ways to do it!

Challenges for Reversing a String in Python How to Reverse A String in Python?

There are several ways to reverse an input string in Python, including using loops, slicing, recursion, and built-in methods. In this guide, we will explore five methods that can be used to reverse a string in Python.

1. Using a Loop

One way to reverse a string is to use a loop. We can iterate over the string from the end and add each character to a new string in reverse order. Here’s an example:

This code iterates over the original string from the last character to the first, adding each character to a new string. The range() function is used to create a sequence of indices in reverse order. You can also utilize the ‘while loop’ in this method.

2. Using Slice Operator

Another way to reverse a string is to use the extended slice syntax of the slice operator. We can slice the string with a step of -1, which reverses the order of the characters. Here’s an example:

This code uses slicing to create a new string that is a reversed version of the original string. The [::-1] notation means to slice the string from the end to the beginning with a step of -1.

3. Using Recursion

We can also use recursion to reverse a string. Here’s an example:

This code uses a recursive function to reverse the string. The function returns the output by checking the length of the string and returns the empty string if the length is 0. Take a note when you return a string, otherwise, it calls itself with a slice of the string that excludes the first character and concatenates the first character to the end of the result.

4. Using join() and reversed()

We can also use the built-in join() and reversed() functions to reverse a string. Here’s an example:

This code uses the reversed() function to create a reverse iterator over the characters in the string, and then joins the characters together using the join() function calls.

5. Using List Comprehension

We can also use list comprehension to reverse a string. Here’s an example:

This code uses a list comprehension to create a Python list of the reversed characters in the string, and then joins the characters together using the join() function.

Method 1: Reversing a String Python by Method A

Define the string to be reversed.

Create an empty string to hold the reversed string.

Iterate through the original string in reverse order to print the end of the string first.

Append each character to the new string.

Print the reversed string.

Code for Reversing a String Using Loop Output Process of Reversing a String Using Loop

Define the original string: Set the original string as “Hello World.”

Create an empty string: Initialize an empty string called “reversed_string” to hold the reversed string.

Iterate through the original string in reverse order:

Start a for loop using the range() function.

Set the starting index as len(string)-1, which is the index of the last character in the string.

Set the ending index as -1, indicating that we iterate up to but not including the first character.

Set the step value as -1 to iterate in reverse order.

Append characters to the new string:

Inside the loop, use the += operator to append each character to the reversed_string.

The += operator is shorthand for reversed_string = reversed_string + string[i], where string[i] represents the current character in the iteration.

Print the reversed string: Use the print() function to display the reversed string.

Method 2: Reversing a String Python by Method B

Define the string to be reversed.

Slice the string from the last character to the first character.

Print the reversed string.

Code for Reversing a String Using String Slicing Output

dlroW olleH

Details on the Process

Define the original string: Set the original string as “Hello World.”

Use string slicing:

Apply string slicing to the original string using the syntax string[start:stop:step].

Set the step value as -1 to slice the string in reverse order.

Since we don’t specify the start and stop indices, Python uses the default values of 0 and the length of the string, respectively.

Retrieve the reversed string: The string slicing operation will extract the reversed version of the original string.

Print the reversed string: Use the print() function to display the reversed string.

Conclusion

In conclusion, we have discussed five Python reverse string methods to reverse a string in Python code. These methods include:

Loops,

String slicing,

Recursion,

Built-in methods.

To learn more about reversing a string in Python, you can use audiovisual resources such as video tutorials and interactive courses. Analytics Vidhya (AV) is a leading platform for data science and machine learning enthusiasts to learn, share, and collaborate on various data science and analytics-related topics. They offer a wide range of resources, including articles, tutorials, courses, and competitions, that can help you learn more about reversing a string in Python.

Here are some ways Analytics Vidhya can help you learn about this topic:

Articles: AV offers a vast library of articles on various topics like data type, data science, data structures, and analytics. You can find several articles on string manipulation in Python, including how to reverse a string. These articles cover various methods, including the ones discussed in this guide, and provide step-by-step instructions on how to implement them.

Tutorials: AV also offers several tutorials on Python programming, including string manipulation. AV also offers several Python tutorials, including string manipulation. After watching a Python tutorial and exercises, you can practice and apply what you have learned.

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